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Local News

  • EARLIER: Session will tackle budget shortfall, slots

    Gov. Steve Beshear has called the General Assembly into special session next week, and legislators will be asked to do some fixing: fix a budget shortfall, fix the state's horse industry, fix bridges and fix the state's programs and incentives for attracting businesses.

    The Governor's office is estimating a budget deficit of nearly $1 billion, which he will propose to repair, at least in part, with just more than $700 million in federal stimulus dollars. The rest of the “fix” will come from budget cuts.

  • News briefs: July 1, 2009

     Holiday closings

    Some local offices and businesses have changed schedules because of the Independence Day, holiday.

    The changed times are: U.S. Post offices: Closed Saturday. Shelby County Court House and Annex: Closed Friday. Shelbyville City Hall: Closed Friday. Simpsonville Town Hall: closed Friday.

    Banks: Citizens Union, American Founders, Chase, U.S. and Republic banks, closed Saturday; State Farm Bank, closed Friday and Saturday.

  • House passes slots; Senate says no

    Gov. Steve Beshear's proposal to allow video slot machines in the state's racetracks appears to be a bad bet to make it through this special session of the General Assembly.

    Though the House narrowly approved the measure, the Senate Appropriations and Revenue Committee voted Monday against sending it to the floor for a vote. State Sen. Gary Tapp, a member of the committee, was one of the Republicans voting against the House bill.

  • EARLIER: Fair-weather fans

    The hot sun didn't keep families and friends from enjoying the attractions of the Shelby County Fair and Horse Show this week.

    Ben Manno, 4, made his first-ever visit to the fair on Wednesday.

    His parents, Ron and Rebecca Manno, said it was his first time riding something by himself.

    “We just thought it would be fun,” Rebecca Manno said. “So far he loves the rides.”

    Olivia Martin stopped by the fair with a couple of her friends.

  • Jackson’s death prompts sellout

    News of pop icon Michael Jackson's death Thursday had an immediate impact on Shelby County residents.

    Fans rushed the Shelbyville Walmart on Thursday night for copies of his CDs, said Gwen Jones, home entertainment department manager.

    Walmart had sold all 16 they had in stock by early Friday.

    Jones said the store expects a shipment with all of Jackson's albums on Saturday.

    “He's pretty popular,” she said. “His CDs have never stopped selling.”

  • Final Fair report: Attendance fell

    Temperatures were up, but attendance at this year's fair was down.

    Officials don't have the exact attendance figures yet for the 2009 Shelby County Fair and Horse Show, but they expect them to be below last year's numbers, said Jeff Hagerman, secretary/treasurer for the Shelby County A & M Association, commonly known as the fair board.

    “It wasn't a record setter, but it wasn't the worst either,” he said.

  • Canadian measure worries burley officials

    A bill proposed in the Canadian Parliament may have the effect of keeping cigarettes made with burley tobacco out of the country, and that's riling members of the state's Congressional officials.

    Canadian Bill C-32 would ban any flavorings in cigarettes marketed in Canada. It is apparently aimed at keeping candy-flavored cigarettes off the market.

  • News briefs: June 26, 2009

    Children’s program

    Shelby County Community Theatre presents Summer Arts Enrichment Workshops for the summer. Preschool Dance, Rock Star Dance, Hip Hop and Scene Study for Teens are being offered for the week of July 13-17.  Deadline for registration is July 6.  Visit www.shelbytheatre.org for more information and registration forms or call 633-0222.

  • Schools to continue after-school programs

    The Shelby County School Board voted Thursday to approve a new Public Schools Day Care Program for the 2009-2010 school year.

    After hearing from parents their concerns about proposed changes, the schools adopted a plan to continue to operate the program and not turn it over to the Frankfort YMCA, as previously had been presented.

    To do so, there will be changes, including a fee increase that will cost parents about $20 more per week, balanced rates for all schools and restriction of care only to after-school hours.

  • Schools plan to continue to run after-school care

    Shelby County Public Schools may continue to operate its own after-school programs for elementary students for the 2009-2010 school year, but there will be changes.

    At its meeting Thursday night at 7, the Shelby County Board of Education will hear a proposal created by the administration and parents that would keep the school system in charge of students after the final bell rings.