.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • fdsafds

    afdsafdsafdsafds

  • EARLIER: Board delays approval of Collins athletic facilities

    The Shelby County Board of Education decided Thursday night to postpone a decision on the proposed athletic facilities for the new Martha Layne Collins High School because of the objections of one of the members.

    Board member Sam Hinkle said he did not like the plan as presented because the athletic facilities deviated from what had been originally proposed by Sherman-Carter-Barnhart, the architectural firm building the new high school.

  • Harrell to become Shelbyville's official city engineer

    In the past, the City of Shelbyville had to contract out much of its engineering work, leading to some expensive bills and grueling lag times on getting results.

    That way of doing business will change on Aug. 3, when Jennifer Harrell takes her position as the city's first official full-time city engineer and public works director.

    "She'll be able do our engineering duties, to look over development plans. In the past we'd have to contract all that out. Now we'll have a full time person on staff to do it," Mayor Tom Hardesty said.

  • Flood plan will identify danger zones

    What would happen if any of Shelby County's three primary dams were to fail?

    That question has been studied recently by local officials, who called in U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to help them develop a contingency plan of action for such a disaster.

    Shelby County is served by dams located at Lake Shelby, Guist Creek and Mary Ross Spillway, and the newest of them, Guist Creek, was built in 1961. Officials don't even know the ages of the other two, but they are more than 50 years old.

  • Flood plan will identify danger zones

    What would happen if any of Shelby County's three primary dams were to fail?

    That question has been studied recently by local officials, who called in U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to help them develop a contingency plan of action for such a disaster.

    Shelby County is served by dams located at Lake Shelby, Guist Creek and Mary Ross Spillway, and the newest of them, Guist Creek, was built in 1961. Officials don't even know the ages of the other two, but they are more than 50 years old.

  • Hatchell to be principal

    Anthony Hatchell, a Shelby County native and the principal at Mayfield High School, is the new principal at Martha Layne Collins High School.

    Hatchell, who was a football and baseball star who went on to to be the head coach at Henry County and Anderson County High Schools, will start his new job on Aug. 1.

    "I'm very excited about the opportunity," Hatchell told The Sentinel-News on Thursday morning.

    Hatchell has been the principal at Mayfield for four years. He said he would wrap up his duties there by the end of the month.

  • New home construction up big in May, still down for the year

    A national report indicates there was a sharp increase in housing construction in May of this year compared to April, and numbers from Triple S Planning & Zoning suggest that Shelby County is following that trend.

    The Commerce Department reported a 17 percent monthly increase for May on privately owned homes nationwide. The rate of 532,000 units was well above the 490,000 that were expected and significantly higher than April's record-low 454,000.

  • News briefs: July 8, 2009

      

    Simpsonville meeting

    There will be a special called meeting of the Simpsonville Site-based Decision-Making Council on Thursday at 1 p.m. in the school library for the purpose of receiving information about candidates from the superintendent and for discussion of interview questions and interview planning.

     

    Meet & Greet

  • Shelby County Fair 2009

    To view this section in full screen, please click on the arrow at the top right of the Print2Flash viewer and select Open In New Window.

  • County to buy 4 ambulances

    The county will be buying four new ambulances to augment its aging fleet.

    Shelby County Fiscal Court voted Tuesday night to purchase four vehicles at an estimated $110,000 per truck at the request of EMS Director Steve Wortham, who reported that four of the county's ambulances are old and worn out.

    Because the older models, whose mileage ranges from 126,000 to 156,000 miles, keep having to be repaired, it would be more economical to replace them, he said.