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Local News

  • EARLIER: Shelby shelters 1st to be 'no kill'

    Shelby County animal rescue officials say their facilities are the first in Kentucky to be totally "no kill."

    The county will complete one year of required no-kill performance on Wednesday, having put down only eight feral cats, sick animals and aggressive dogs and achieving a 90 percent adoption.

    A facility must not euthanize more than 10 percent of the animals it collects to qualify as "no kill."

  • Burial for twins set for Friday

    A woman from Simpsonville is recovering at the University of Louisville Hospital after a car crash last week took the lives of her unborn daughters.

    Jennifer Smothers, 20, is listed in serious condition in the intensive care unit.

    Her twin girls, Jenna Darlene and Jessi Robin Smothers, will be buried Friday at 2 p.m. at Highland Memory Gardens.

  • EARLIER: Simpsonville woman loses twins in car crash

    Mount Washington Police have released the names of the drivers involved in a tragic Wednesday afternoon accident that may have resulted in the death of unborn twins.

    The accident on KY-44 East involved pregnant mother Jennifer E. Smothers, 20, of Simpsonville. She sustained serious injuries, according to Mount Washington fire officials.

    The driver of the other vehicle involved was Melissa D. Caudill, 40, of Mount Washington. She sustained serious injuries but was later released from the University of Louisville Hospital, according to Mount Washington Police.

  • Update: Man struck by lightning dies

    A man who was struck by lightning last week has died.

    Brian Larsh was struck by lightning last Wednesday while waiting for a ride home from his job at Shelby Industries on McDaniels Drive.

    He was in critical condition at Jewish Hospital in Louisville until Friday, when he passed away, said Wayne Allen, vice president of Shelby Industries.

    No visitation will be held, Allen said, but he plans to have a memorial service for Larsh at the plant.

  • EARLIER: Man struck by lightning at work

    Though still in critical condition Thursday, a Shelbyville man is still alive because of some heroic action on the part of his co-workers.

    When Brian Larsh, 50, was struck by lightning at his workplace on Wednesday, his friends rushed to his aid.

    Larsh was struck around lunchtime, while standing under a tree at Shelby Industries, said Wayne Allen, vice president of the company.

  • Man struck by lightning

    An employee of Shelby Industries remains in critical condition at Jewish Hospital in Louisville after being struck by lightning Wednesday.

    Brian Larsh, 50, was taken to Jewish Hospital Shelbyville shortly before noon, said Wayne Allen, vice-president of Shelby Industries.

    Fellow employees, including Allen, rushed to his aid, doing CPR until paramedics arrived.

    After being treated at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville, Larsh was transferred to Louisville for further treatment early Wednesday evening.

  • Ready or not, here it comes

    Popular TV shows like So You Think You Can Dance? have captured the attention of viewers across the nation. But come Friday, the real question is do you think you can watch?

    That's because television stations are set to switch from an analog broadcast signal to a digital signal Friday, and reports are indicating that millions of unprepared people still do not have the needed converter box, or an alternate service of cable or satellite. Those left without the proper equipment will lose their television signal and only see the dance off between black and white ants: static.

  • Tractor-trailer wrecks on interstate ramp

    A tractor-trailer wrecked Thursday morning when the driver lost control of the rig on the rain-slick pavement of I-64 eastbound.

    Shelbyville Police Officer Bruce Gentry said the driver, who was going up the exit 32B ramp at about 40 miles per hour, was not injured and that no other vehicles were involved in the accident.

    “I just thank God no one was hurt,” said truck driver Allan Winnings of Tennessee. “I don’t even want to think about what could have happened if somebody had been behind me.”

  • Strong effort in tough times makes the Crusade for Children a success

    Despite money being tight for a lot of people these days, the 56th annual WHAS Crusade for Children fundraising saw only a 3 percent overall decrease in Shelby County. Better still, this past weekend saw three of the seven participating local fire departments actually improved upon their 2008 totals.

    The total raised by all local fire departments this year was $157,217.70 - compared to $162,077.18 in 2008.

    The fire departments from Mt. Eden, Shelbyville, and Waddy all gathered more in 2009 than they did last year.

  • Animal shelter strives to stay "No Kill"

    James Collins stroked the head of "Willie," a cuddly Yorkie with a blue ribbon in his hair, as he talked about an email that had a caused a stir in the community.

    His email, which had been sent out community wide on Wednesday, read, "With tears flowing, I have made the decision that we must euthanize on Friday if we cannot move the animals currently listed on Pet Finder. Please help us now."

    Collins said that email has accomplished what he hoped it would: Enough animals were adopted so that euthanization will not be necessary.