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Local News

  • Jackson’s death prompts sellout

    News of pop icon Michael Jackson's death Thursday had an immediate impact on Shelby County residents.

    Fans rushed the Shelbyville Walmart on Thursday night for copies of his CDs, said Gwen Jones, home entertainment department manager.

    Walmart had sold all 16 they had in stock by early Friday.

    Jones said the store expects a shipment with all of Jackson's albums on Saturday.

    “He's pretty popular,” she said. “His CDs have never stopped selling.”

  • Final Fair report: Attendance fell

    Temperatures were up, but attendance at this year's fair was down.

    Officials don't have the exact attendance figures yet for the 2009 Shelby County Fair and Horse Show, but they expect them to be below last year's numbers, said Jeff Hagerman, secretary/treasurer for the Shelby County A & M Association, commonly known as the fair board.

    “It wasn't a record setter, but it wasn't the worst either,” he said.

  • Canadian measure worries burley officials

    A bill proposed in the Canadian Parliament may have the effect of keeping cigarettes made with burley tobacco out of the country, and that's riling members of the state's Congressional officials.

    Canadian Bill C-32 would ban any flavorings in cigarettes marketed in Canada. It is apparently aimed at keeping candy-flavored cigarettes off the market.

  • News briefs: June 26, 2009

    Children’s program

    Shelby County Community Theatre presents Summer Arts Enrichment Workshops for the summer. Preschool Dance, Rock Star Dance, Hip Hop and Scene Study for Teens are being offered for the week of July 13-17.  Deadline for registration is July 6.  Visit www.shelbytheatre.org for more information and registration forms or call 633-0222.

  • Schools to continue after-school programs

    The Shelby County School Board voted Thursday to approve a new Public Schools Day Care Program for the 2009-2010 school year.

    After hearing from parents their concerns about proposed changes, the schools adopted a plan to continue to operate the program and not turn it over to the Frankfort YMCA, as previously had been presented.

    To do so, there will be changes, including a fee increase that will cost parents about $20 more per week, balanced rates for all schools and restriction of care only to after-school hours.

  • Schools plan to continue to run after-school care

    Shelby County Public Schools may continue to operate its own after-school programs for elementary students for the 2009-2010 school year, but there will be changes.

    At its meeting Thursday night at 7, the Shelby County Board of Education will hear a proposal created by the administration and parents that would keep the school system in charge of students after the final bell rings.

  • Finchville teen gets perfect score on ACT

     For one day, Jake W. Fish was perfect and in rare company.

    Fish, 17, a resident of Finchville, was the only high school student in Kentucky who scored the maximum of 36 on the American College Test in testing for April.

    On his day - one of six times annually students can take the ACT - Fish was among 268 nationally who had a perfect score.

    The test, one of the two college entrance exams, has been conducted three times in 2009, and only seven Kentuckians and 498 students nationally have scored 36, ACT spokesman Ed Colby said.

  • Martinrea to remain open

    Some positive news is finally being produced at Martinrea Heavy Stamping.

    The company and its employees were able to reach a new, 4-year agreement last week that will keep the company from going under.

    Although the company's 200 members of the United Auto Workers were split on the issue, with a 55 percent vote in favor of the negotiations, both sides say they are hopeful.

  • News briefs: June 24, 2009

     Road work ahead

  • Martinrea to remain open

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping and its employees have reached an agreement to remain open.

    UAW members voted last week to make adjustments to its agreement with the company that will keep its doors open. Last month, the union had rejected a proposal, and officials had announced a closing date for July.

    Although the company’s 200 union employees were split on the issue, with a 55 percent vote in favor of the negotiations, both sides seem hopeful.