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Local News

  • Finchville teen gets perfect score on ACT

     For one day, Jake W. Fish was perfect and in rare company.

    Fish, 17, a resident of Finchville, was the only high school student in Kentucky who scored the maximum of 36 on the American College Test in testing for April.

    On his day - one of six times annually students can take the ACT - Fish was among 268 nationally who had a perfect score.

    The test, one of the two college entrance exams, has been conducted three times in 2009, and only seven Kentuckians and 498 students nationally have scored 36, ACT spokesman Ed Colby said.

  • Martinrea to remain open

    Some positive news is finally being produced at Martinrea Heavy Stamping.

    The company and its employees were able to reach a new, 4-year agreement last week that will keep the company from going under.

    Although the company's 200 members of the United Auto Workers were split on the issue, with a 55 percent vote in favor of the negotiations, both sides say they are hopeful.

  • News briefs: June 24, 2009

     Road work ahead

  • Martinrea to remain open

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping and its employees have reached an agreement to remain open.

    UAW members voted last week to make adjustments to its agreement with the company that will keep its doors open. Last month, the union had rejected a proposal, and officials had announced a closing date for July.

    Although the company’s 200 union employees were split on the issue, with a 55 percent vote in favor of the negotiations, both sides seem hopeful.

  • Martinrea to remain open

    Martinrea Heavy Stamping and its employees have reached an agreement to remain open.

    UAW members voted last week to make adjustments to its agreement with the company that will keep its doors open. Last month, the union had rejected a proposal, and officials had announced a closing date for July.

    Although the company’s 200 union employees were split on the issue, with a 55 percent vote in favor of the negotiations, both sides seem hopeful.

  • News briefs: June 17, 2009

     4th Street closed

    starting today  

    Effective today 4th Street in Shelbyville will close indefinitely because of the construction of the new Shelby County Judicial Center.

    The street had been partially closed for several months. Construction is scheduled to be completed in 2010.

    Customers now only will be able to access the Shelbyville Post Office from Main Street. There will be no access from Washington Street.

  • Fair starts 10-day run on Thursday

    Fans of loud music and screaming kids brace yourselves: the Himalaya is back.

    Crews from Drew Exposition were setting up the crowd favorite, which has been missing in action for the past couple of years, on the Shelby County Fairgrounds on Monday.

    It will join other carnival rides at the 147th Shelby County Fair, which opens Thursday and runs through June 27.

  • Southside chooses Rowe

    Michael Rowe, who served as interim principal at Shelby County High School for 2008-09, has been chosen as the new principal at Southside Elementary, and Lisa Waller, principal at Silver Creek Elementary in Berea, will be the new Elementary Instructional Supervisor for Shelby County Public Schools.

    Their appointments were announced Tuesday by Shelby County Public Schools.

    Rowe will replace Sue Ellen Caldwell, who is retiring, and Waller fills the vacancy created by the move of B.J. Martin to a job with the Kentucky Department of Education.

  • Shelbyville OKs new standards for commercial areas

    A new zoning district soon may set stricter standards for the quality of construction in some areas of Shelbyville.

    City Council approved on first reading Thursday a new ordinance proposed by Ryan Libke, Executive Director of the Triple S Planning Commission, to create a zoning district aimed at promoting high quality development along commercial corridors.

    Libke’s measure cites commercial corridors that have been developed haphazardly and others that have deteriorated and are in need of visual improvements.

  • Martinrea's closing is 'big blow' in community

    The demise of one of Shelby County's industrial giants was, in the end, quick, but it won't be painless.

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty, who received the official letter Tuesday of the closing of Martinrea Heavy Stamping, called that shutdown "a big blow to this community."

    County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger agreed.