Local News

  • Schools to consider expanding summers

    After a successful summer school expansion that focused on literacy in first- and third-grade students last year, Shelby County Superintendent James Neihof will ask the Shelby County Board of Education to help fund an even bigger undertaking at Thursday's 7 p.m. meeting at Southside Elementary.

  • Green movement to start at its home

    The City of Shelbyville's Public Works Department is looking to turn its property into a showplace and teaching tool for a cleaner environment.

    Jennifer Herrell, the public works director and city engineer, received a $24,000 grant that will help fund the project to turn the location at 787 Kentucky Street into a sustainable and green campus for the city.

    When it's finished, the project will show several different ways to help deal with storm water runoff, as part of the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System program (MS4) she heads for the city.

  • EARLIER: City gives first OK to new sidewalk plan

    The Shelbyville City Council took the first step in toughening up its sidewalk ordinance.

    The council approved the first reading of an ordinance amendment that will allow property owners to go before the Code Enforcement Board if they wish to argue whether or not the sidewalk adjacent to or abutting their property needs to be fixed.

    The city’s current ordinance states that any property owner with a sidewalk along their property is responsible for the upkeep of that sidewalk.

  • EARLIER: Shelby Parks unveiling a plan for trail around Shelbyville

    Think about going out for a run or a walk and being able to get on a trail at Clear Creek Park and tour the perimeter of Shelbyville to wind up at Red Orchard Park.

    That long-range vision is starting to come into focus, and the Clear Creek  Conservation Trust is planning to spread the word to the public at a meeting March 28 at Collins High School.

  • EARLIER: Anderson jail spat could bring $$$$ to Shelby

    Anderson County Jailer Joani Clark says she is considering moving inmates to Shelby County, which could be a boon for the Shelby County Detention Center.
    Clark revealed the problems she is having with Franklin Jailer Billy Roberts during last Tuesday morning’s meeting of the Anderson County Fiscal Court.
    “We’ve had numerous problems, and it’s getting on my last nerve,” Clark said during her department head report. “I’m getting a proposal from Shelby County.”

  • Woman injured by gas is improving

    Jennifer Lewis, the woman who was poisoned by carbon monoxide in January, is continuing to recover at a hospital in Louisville, and this past weekend friends gathered for a benefit to help pay for that recovery.

    A fundraiser held by the Wright Elementary School PTA moms at the school Friday was very well-attended, said PTA President Angela Bowens.

    “It went very well; we had somewhere between five and six hundred people,” Bowens said, adding she has not heard what the total contributions are.

  • Craig, Fast get new court dates

    Two high-profile court cases, one involving embezzlement and the other homicide-related, were rescheduled Tuesday in Shelby Circuit Court.

    Kelly Craig, 45, a longtime former employee of Tracy’s Home Furnishings who was charged with stealing thousands from that store, was given a new court date of April 18.

    Joshua Fast, 24, charged with second-degree manslaughter and second-degree burglary, also had been scheduled to appear before Circuit Judge Charles Hickman, but his case was continued to May 2.

  • News Briefs: March 9, 2011

    State added new jobs
    for 1st time in 3 years

    Kentucky gained 300 jobs in 2010, the first increase in annual employment in three years, state officials announced Monday. For the year, the state’s unemployment rate fell to 10.5 percent, from 10.7 percent in 2009.
    “Kentucky’s economy stabilized in 2010 ... however, the economic recovery and job growth have been painstakingly slow,” said Justine Detzel, chief labor market analyst for the state Office of Employment and Training.

  • Shelbyville passes first vote to tweak sidewalk law

    The Shelbyville City Council passed the first reading of its sidewalk ordinance amendment at Thursday’s meeting.

    The council voted unanimously to allow some due process and the potential for fines with the much-maligned ordinance. The amendment will not go into affect until a second reading is passed, which cannot occur until the council’s next meeting on April 7.

    The amendment allows for property owners to go before the Code Enforcement Board if they wish to argue whether or not they should have to fix their sidewalk.

  • Rise of gas prices slows – but not worries

    Rising gas prices may drop well before speculators predict, but that doesn’t mean consumers haven’t already felt the hit.

    With the news of possible peace negotiations between Libyan Leader Moammar Gadhafi and the uprising rebels, gas prices tumbled a $1.60 during mid-day trading Thursday. But after nearly two weeks of drastic increases, many consumers are already feeling the pinch.

    According to a Rasmussen Report released yesterday, consumers are already bracing for a costly spring and summer.