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Local News

  • Teen killed; suspect still at-large

    A teen-ager is dead after being shot and killed  near downtown Shelbyville on Wednesday night, and police have not yet apprehended his killer.

    Joel Diego Mena, 17,  of Shelbyville died of a single gunshot wound after an altercation at the intersection of 9th and College Streets, near the old Northside Elementary School,  about 8 p.m., police said.

  • CASA needs new casa

    The organization that advocates for children who are in out-of-home care could use a home itself. Actually, a good-sized room will do.

    For the past year, Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA) for children has been housed in the basement of Dr. Dan Bowersox's optometry business on Washington Street in Shelbyville. By early April the organization needs to get out.

    "He's been wonderful to us, but he needs the space," CASA Director Beverly Hilger said. "He told us when he let us come in we would have to move eventually."

  • Youth gunned down Wednesday night

    Joel Diego Mena, 17, of Shelbyville, died Wednesday night after being shot near the intersection of College and 9th streets, police say.

    Mena was shot once with what police think was a 9 mm handgun. He was pronounced dead at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville around 9 p.m.

    Police have not arrested a suspect in the killing but are seeking Santiago Caballero, 22, of Shelbyville, for questioning, according to Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte.

    He added that an autopsy will be preformed at the University of Louisville.

  • Storm aftermath slowly subsiding

    The ice continues to melt away, and the frozen trees with their glistening branches are just a memory. 

    But the storm's aftermath still lingers, both in ongoing power outages and with the school schedule.

    On Thursday, Shelby County School officials reported that students will have to go to school well into June,  that is, if there are no more snow days.

  • New week, new storm, new outages

    It was 'here we go again' Wednesday night as a severe wind storm  blew through Shelby County, knocking out power that just this week had been restored in some places.

    “First it was the ice storm, and now this,” Emergency Management Agency Director Charlie Frazee said.

    Although hundreds of residents were without power Wednesday night and Thursday morning, electricity had been restored to almost everyone by Thursday afternoon, power officials said.

  • School board to review plan

    Shelby County Schools Superintendent James Neihof says it's time to reassess some future plans for new campuses.

    And on Thursday the Shelby County Board of Education accepted his recommendation to determine if the district's interim Organizational Plan in the current District Facility Plan still is appropriate.

    The interim Organizational Plan calls for the new secondary school facility to house students in grades 8 and 9 from its opening year of 2010 through 2015.

  • July 4 fireworks may fizzle

    Unless a financial backer steps forward, the life flame of the annual 4th of July “Fireworks at the Park” celebration may burn out in 2009.

    “Basically, we’re cutting out the Fourth of July fireworks due to budgetary constraints,” Shelby County Parks and Recreation Director Clay Cottongim said. “We figured with the economy and budget constraints we needed to start looking at some cuts, and this is the first one.”

  • Fourth of July show is back on

    After the Shelby County Parks and Recreation Board announced last week that it wouldn’t have the funding to put on its annual Fourth of July Fireworks Celebration at Clear Creek Park this year, two major contributors came to the forefront to make their intentions clear: The show must go on.

    Gabriel and Tracy Giordano, owners of the Briar Rose Estate on Anderson Lane and residents of San Diego, California, came forward and offered to provide the fireworks for the event.

  • Huge tree falls on house

    Liz Kimbrough and her family were enjoying a quiet evening at home Wednesday night with a cozy fire in the grate when pandemonium suddenly broke loose.

    “I was standing in the kitchen, and all of a sudden I heard a great big 'whump!' and the house shook, and I thought a tornado had hit,” Jack Kimbrough said. “I took off for the basement, and Liz was right behind me.”

    But what they heard was not a tornado.

  • Some homes not ready to convert to digital TV

    Some homes not ready to convert to digital TV

    Scott McDaniel