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Local News

  • ‘Good reports’ for first day of school

    At 7 a.m. Thursday, parents and their children were lined up outside Southside Elementary as the sun began to peak over the nearby tree line and welcome them to the first day of school. It was quiet, a cool 72 degrees, and the mood was relaxed.

    School faculty watched out the front doors, waiting for 7:15 a.m. – the time when the doors would open and the kids could be directed to the classrooms they’d come to know very well over the next year.

  • Local EMS response time above national average

    Steve Wortham works with people who stare life and death in the face every day.

    His staff of 45 paramedics and EMTs work to save lives, and they do it more efficiently than just about any other  unit in the country.

    That's not just his opinion - its backed up by statistics, he says.

    Shelby County EMS, headed by Wortham, its director, enjoys a response time two minutes faster than the national average, based on statistics compiled by the American Ambulance Association.

  • CASA raising funds, awareness

    The work of CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates for children) may be the best kept secret in Shelby County, but Beverly Hilger wishes it weren't.

    Hilger is the director of CASA for Shelby and Spencer counties. CASA volunteers work with children who have been placed out of their homes because of abuse or neglect. Their work saves the state hundreds of thousands of dollars every year, Hilger said.

  • Tingle named new Simpsonville Elementary principal

    Simpsonville Elementary -- meet the Tingles.

    When its Site-Based Decision-Making Council unanimously agreed last Wednesday that Jill Tingle was a perfect fit for the position of Simpsonville Elementary Principal, that group may not have realized that she'll be heading to work with half of her family by her side.

  • 'We're living in poop'

    Monthly rent and water bill: $420

    Cleaning gloves and bleach: $20

    Scrubbing the bathtub clean only to have it once again fill up with raw sewage five minutes later: Disgusting.

    If something smells off at Wesley Apartments, check the plumbing.

    "We're living in poop," said resident Kristy Griffith. "There's no other way of saying it."

    For the last two weeks, Griffith said toilets have been burping and bathtubs have been backing up with sewage in many of the C-apartments at Wesley Apartments off of Midland Trail.

  • Courthouse beset by fowl situation

    Some describe it as slimy; some call it nasty and disgusting.

    But everyone agrees that the sidewalk outside the back door of the Shelby County Courthouse is not sanitary.

    The reason: piles of pigeon droppings.

    But the pigeons that call the courthouse ledges home soon may have a bird's-eye view of a different perch if county officials have their way.

    Shelby County Deputy Judge-Executive Rusty Newton said the county is - once again - devising a plan to make the birds flock together someplace else.

  • Health care debate hits very close to home

    While Congress is busy debating major health care reform in Washington, some Shelby County residents have become part of what they call a grassroots effort to make their thoughts known. Joy Tabler is making phone calls to Congressmen and collecting signatures this week opposing proposed cuts to Medicare and its funding of in-home health care. Tabler is the patient care liaison for Caretenders, a home health care provider on Alpine Drive. She said home health care keeps patients in their homes and out of expensive health care facilities, such as hospi

  • News Briefs: Aug. 12, 2009

    Bypass work could cause some delays, rerouting

    The construction of the Shelbyville Bypass could cause some disruptions in the areas of Harrington Mill Road, LaGrange Road and Midland Industrial Parkway. A State Transportation Cabinet briefing said some motorists could be delayed or rerouted around ongoing work.

    Also, two work projects on I-64 in Shelby County continue.

  • News Briefs: Aug. 7, 2009

    Grant applications

  • Shelbyville 2009 tax rates to stay level

    Shelbyville's property tax rates will likely remain the same for yet another year.

    Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance Thursday night, levying ad valorem property tax rates for the calendar year of 2009.

    The tax rate proposed this year is 27.5 cents per $100 assessed real property. The rate is expected to produce $1,972,111 - nearly $16,000 more than last year.