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Local News

  • Injured construction workers recovering

    Two men who fell through the roof of a business under construction Tuesday are recovering.

    Ray Fulcher, who suffered from a broken femur and possible hip complications, is in fair condition at the University of Louisville, where he was transported after the accident.

    Bruce Werner Jr. is also doing well, having received only minor scrapes and bruises and a cut on his face, said Denny Williams, district manager of Tradesmen International.

    Another man was also on the roof when it fell, but he was not hospitalized, Williams said.

  • Busy or not, Shelby does Derby

    Downtown Shelbyville has plenty to offer those readying themselves for the

    135th running of the Kentucky Derby. That is, if anybody really cares this

    year.

    “Unfortunately, it’s just not what it used to be. It’s not in its heyday

    anymore,” Patti Wilson, designer with Wakefield-Scearce Galleries, said of

    the declining Derby boom in Shelbyville.

    “It’s pretty dead now, and Derby day will be dead. It has been the last

  • EARLIER: Casey fights for his life

    Former Shelby County and UK basketball star Mike Casey continues to fight an ever-critical battle for his life at a hospital in Nashville.

    Casey underwent a 6-hour procedure Tuesday at Vanderbilt University Hospital to install a bilateral pump in support of his increasingly malfunctioning heart. His condition is critical, but doctors are hopeful this pump will help to relieve his body of a raging infection and allow him to receive a heart transplant that is necessary to extend his life.

  • Tapp will not seek reelection in 2010

    State Senator Gary Tapp, a member of the Kentucky Senate since 2003, has announced he will not seek reelection in 2010.  Tapp served in the Kentucky House for four years before his two terms in the State Senate representing District 20, comprising Shelby, Bullitt, and Spencer Counties.

  • Shelby prepares for swine flu

    As the new swine flu pandemic makes its way across the world, Shelby County is preparing for the worst.

    By Monday the swine flu had infected nearly 2,000 people and claimed more than 150 lives in Mexico alone, the country of this particular virus’s origin.

    By comparison the U.S. has only been affected on a minor level.

  • Southside students get life skills early

    Southside Elementary students got a crash course on the basics of economics in a workshop held Tuesday at the school.

    The workshop was held by Citi Foundation, in conjunction with the Kentucky Council of Economic Education.

    Betty Sue Johnson with the council said that KCEE is the only statewide organization that invests in economic educators.

    "In teaching economics and personal finance, we empower Kentucky's youth with knowledge about the everyday business of life," she said.

  • Shelby charities lagging state

    A new report on the status of Kentucky’s nonprofit sector shows just how much agencies in Shelby County are struggling.

    The data, compiled by the University of Kentucky through 2006, shows Shelby County ranks 81st among 120 counties in non-profit distributions, with $5,963,908, and the county is one of 40 that actually have more expenses than assets ($5,289,022).

    The report is based on organizations that claim federal tax-exempt status through 501c(3) status. This includes hospital chains, colleges and universities and other large foundations.

  • Triple S approves new Kroger plans

    Triple S Planning and Zoning approved a development plan for a new Kroger Marketplace grocery store to be placed in Hi-Point Shopping Center at Boone Station Rd. and Willamsburg Rd. in Shelbyville. The building will be around 123,000 sq. ft. -- 30,000 sq. ft. larger than the similar store in Middletown -- and will include both a drive-thru pharmacy and a gas station.

    The commission also approved an amended development plan to add 9,214 sq feet on to the current Humana Data Facility on Citizens Boulevard in Simpsonville.

  • Recycling center moves to blunt price drop

    Those old bales of cardboard, empty wine bottles, milk jugs and tuna fish cans just don’t bring what they used to.

  • Fiscal Court sends storm debris headed to the chopping block

    There’s a huge pile of debris left over from the winter ice storm, and Shelby County Fiscal Court is going to get rid of it.

    Magistrates agreed Tuesday to pay for grinding the debris into chips at the request of Road Department Supervisor Carl Henry.

    "There's a pile of brush and debris 10,000 cubic yards wide at the road department; that's bigger than this building," Henry told magistrates.

    He said he knows that's how much brush there is because he has been keeping track of it.