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Local News

  • Fiscal Court sends storm debris headed to the chopping block

    There’s a huge pile of debris left over from the winter ice storm, and Shelby County Fiscal Court is going to get rid of it.

    Magistrates agreed Tuesday to pay for grinding the debris into chips at the request of Road Department Supervisor Carl Henry.

    "There's a pile of brush and debris 10,000 cubic yards wide at the road department; that's bigger than this building," Henry told magistrates.

    He said he knows that's how much brush there is because he has been keeping track of it.

  • March 11, 2009: Heart problems continue for Casey

     Mike Casey says he is feeling OK – even managing some smiles and chuckles -- and fighting the good fight against his longtime heart problems.

    Casey, Shelby County’s legendary former basketball star, is being treated at Vanderbilt University in Nashville, where doctors are hoping sometime soon to replace his infection-ravaged heart,

    “I’m high on the list for a heart transplant,” he said by phone on Friday. “But I’m not at the top of the list.”

  • EARLIER: UAW officials refute claims by Martinrea

    United Auto Workers officials at Martinrea Heavy Stamping disputed a report Wednesday that they had rejected a final offer from the company to restructure their existing contract.

    In a statement, General Manager Shawn Aldesberger said, "Martinrea regrets that the union has chosen to walk away from the table and not present the last proposals to the employees of Martinrea Heavy Stampings."

    But Wednesday morning union committee members said that wasn't the case at all.

  • EARLIER: School board approves plan for 2 8-12 schools

    The Shelby Count School Board gave its formal approval Thursday night of an  organizational plan for its new secondary school being built west of Shelbyville.

    This plan, first introduced the board at its last meeting, calls for the new secondary center to serve as a second high school, with grades 8 through 12 being housed at both the newly named Martha Layne Collins High School and Shelby County High School.

    East and West Middle Schools will have grades 6 and 7. This would go into affect for the 2010-11 school year.

  • Turmoil at Martinrea continues to grow

    Last week, the situation at Martinrea took a turn for the worse, at least for employee morale.

    Several members of the United Auto Workers who work at Martinrea Heavy Stamping contacted The Sentinel-News and expressed extreme agitation with plant officials. The employees, who were granted anonymity because they feared for their jobs, said that they were being bullied by plant officials.

  • Q&A: Neihof answers questions about new school plan

    On Thursday night the Shelby County School Board approved a new plan for how it will populate its high schools and middle schools after completion of the Martha Layne Collins Secondary Center being built west of Shelbyville.

    There will be two district-wide high schools for grades 8 through 12 -- Shelby County High School and the new Collins High School -- and East and West Middle Schools will house grades 6 and 7.

    The plan has received widespread reaction from parents and concerns from at least one school-board member -- Sam Hinkle -- who voted against it.

  • We give you: The Shelbyville Conference Center?

    Just off I-64 in Brighton Circle, next to the Ramada Inn, Great Escape 8 Theatre and Cattleman's Roadhouse, Shelbyville may soon have its major conference center.

    Shelby County residents Robert and Elise Andrews, owners of Elegance, LLC., presented their plan for such a center Tuesday to County Judge Executive Rob Rothenburger, Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty and other community leaders.

  • School board to consider schedule, new school plan

    Two hot topics will go before the Shelby County School Board at its meeting Thursday night.

    The board will hear about changes in the 2009-10 school calendar and the organizational plan for its new secondary center west of Shelbyville.

    The calendar the board will review has been redesigned with a later start date for students and fewer days overall. The changes were made prompted by needs expressed by parents and staff, as well as to cut expenses in response to recent budget cuts by the state, school officials say.

  • City makes 2 new appointments, creates new position

    Last month the Shelbyville City Council increased the number of appointees who serve on the Code Enforcement Board from three to five, and the number of members on the Historic District Commission from five to seven.

    On Thursday the council made one new appointment to each.

    Gene Wright was appointed to the Historic District Commission, and Lisa Hood was named to the Code Enforcement Board -- both for 3-year terms.

  • Dennen named executive director of Kentucky Heritage Council

    It’s permanent. After serving as interim executive director of the Kentucky Heritage Council for the last eight months, Shelbyville resident Mark Dennen officially was appointed to the post by Gov. Steve Beshear on Friday.

    “Mark brings a wealth of knowledge and experience to the Heritage Council and is well respected for his work,” Marcheta Sparrow, secretary of the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet said in a release. “Preservation in Kentucky will be in good hands with Mark as executive director.”