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Local News

  • Power restored after morning outage

    A power outage Friday morning knocked out electricity to nearly 4,000 residences and businesses – including Shelby County High School – for about an hour and a half.

    Bob Price, team leader for Kentucky Utilities, said 3,900 KU customers lost power between 8 and 9:30 a.m. because of an equipment failure at a main power station behind Kroger.

    "We had an equipment failure at our distribution substation at Shelbyville East," he said.

    Price said that although the problem is still not repaired, crews were able to restore power to everyone.

  • Police consider moving firearms training to summer

    The Shelbyville Police Department, whose firing range is under scrutiny because of its proximity to elementary schools, is considering moving all activities there to non-school hours, Police Major Danny Goodwin said.

      "We're flexible; we'll bend," Goodwin said. "The last thing we want to do is put someone's life in jeopardy.  

  • Hardesty could go home today

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty could go home today, just a week after emergency stomach surgery was required to save his life.

    “He is going to have some tests done today. If they all are OK, then he’ll possibly go home tomorrow,” said Peggy Thompson, the mayor's administrative assistant.

    The surgery last Wednesday was in response to a bleeding ulcer – a condition that his doctor said could have resulted in death if not repaired.

  • EARLIER: Bypass findings: Contract, delays with inspections key problems

    FRANKFORT - A meeting Friday between state officials and the contractors working on the Shelbyville Bypass revealed two key pieces of information:

    State transportation officials admitted they won't repeat the mistakes made in what they consider a lenient contract, and Kay and Kay Construction officials said in some cases the state inspectors have delayed progress on the roadway.

    Engineers also encouraged the contractors to put larger crews on the job, and weekly meetings were scheduled to monitor progress.

  • EARLIER: Hardesty 'doing fine' after surgery

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty is recovering at Jewish Hospital after emergency surgery Wednesday for a bleeding ulcer.

    Hardesty had a third of his stomach removed in the surgery and will be hospitalized for 7-10 days, his wife said.

    Hardesty's wife, Maxine, said that the doctor told her that, if Hardesty had not had the surgery when he did, he likely would have bled to death by morning.

    "I know there were numerous prayers for him, and we can't begin to thank each of you enough," she said.

  • Beware of deer everywhere

    Dustin Shouse of Shelbyville contemplated the mangled deer draped across the hood of his car. “It scared me to death,” he said, lifting the animal’s antlers. “It jumped right into the car.

  • Substance abuse program gets $67,800 federal grant

    Some federal stimulus money has found its way to Shelby County through a one-time grant of $67,800 that was awarded to the Shelby County Substance Abuse Treatment Program.

    SAT was presented the 2009 ARRA Justice Assistance Grant by Gov. Steve Beshear during a presentation in Frankfort on Wednesday.

    The funds must be used within one year.

  • News Briefs: Oct. 30, 2009

     Hardesty resting at home

    Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty went home from the hospital Saturday and is doing well. It is not known when he will return to the office, as he continues to recover from recent major surgery. Hardesty was hospitalized on Oct. 19 and underwent emergency, life-saving surgery for bleeding ulcers.

  • Demand for H1N1 vaccine high

    Though the H1N1 flu vaccine is being distributed to medical facilities by the North Central District Health Department as quickly as it arrives, those dosages are not keeping up with the demand in Shelby County. New shipments arrive weekly, typically several hundred to just more than a thousand, officials say, but requests for vaccinations are going unmet because so many people have grown concerned about the strain of flu that has claimed 11 lives in Kentucky. Distributing to primary-care physicians, OBGYN’s and pediatricians has proved the most efficient

  • Shelby man dies of heart attack in dump-truck wreck

    An auto accident Wednesday involving a dump truck smashing into some trees was the result of the driver having a heart attack, the coroner's office said.

    Donald McIntosh, 63, died of a heart attack, which caused him to run off the road and wreck his dump truck, Shelby County Deputy Coroner Jeff Ivers said.

    "The medical examiner's officer called me this morning [Thursday] and told me that Mr. McIntosh had died of a heart attack," Ivers said.