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Local News

  • ‘Puppy mill’ case will go to trial

    EMINENCE: The Henry County woman charged with more than 200 counts of animal cruelty will take her case to trial.

    On Monday Terri L. Smith of Campbellsburg, through her attorney, asked for a jury trial in her case, which consists of 218 counts of first degree animal cruelty, a Class A misdemeanor.

    Henry County Attorney Virginia Harrod said Smith’s attorney, George Carter, arrived for Monday’s hearing and immediately requested a jury trial.

  • News briefs: Feb. 24, 2012

    Shelby siblings win scholarships

    to space camp in Alabama

    A brother and sister from Shelby County are among 256 students worldwide who have won scholarships to the Honeywell Leadership Challenge Academy at the U.S. Space & Rocket Center in Huntsville, Ala.

    Marina White, a student at Collins High School, and her brother Sam, a student at Christian Academy Louisville, were the only students from Kentucky chosen for the scholarship.

  • Triple S Planning Commission: Commissioners hedge OK of Roll Forming expansion

    The Triple S Planning Commission approved the request from Roll Forming Corp. to add almost 26,000 square feet of space to its existing aerospace facility with an additional requirement.

    Two property owners showed up for Tuesday's meeting at the Stratton Center, asking about the water flow for the drainage behind the building and what other measures would be taken.

  • Shelbyville tenants without power, water

    Apartments are going dark and faucets are running dry in several rental buildings in Shelbyville, and Fred Harrington is looking for some answers.

    Harrington has lived at 908 Main St. for about a year now, and he said he loves his home.

    "I'm not leaving, I've done to much work to my apartment, and this is the nicest place I've ever lived," he said. "I'm fighting to the end."

    Harrington sat on the porch of the home near downtown Shelbyville, which has been divided into seven apartments.

  • Senate says no to casinos

    There will be no vote by the public on casino gambling in Kentucky.

    The Senate on Thursday voted down Senate Bill 151, which would have placed a constitutional amendment before the public, with 21 voting against the measure and 16 for it.

    For a constitutional amendment to pass the Senate it needs three-fifths approval, which would be 23 in favor.

  • O’Brien sues Pearce over lease

    O’Brien of Shelbyville, Inc., which owns the county’s Ford dealership, is suing its landlord over an option to purchase the land on Mount Eden Road where the dealership is located.

    O’Brien filed the lawsuit Feb. 3 in Shelby Circuit Court, alleging that the property owner, Robert Pearce of Shelbyville, had breached an agreement to sell the property.

  • Woman left by the side of the road has gone home to Arizona

    After three and a half months at the University of Louisville Hospital, much of that time spent in a coma in the intensive care unit, Denisse Escareno finally was going home.

    She lay in her hospital bed Thursday morning, tubes in her throat and stomach and IV lines in her arm. Her eyes were vacant, and she didn’t move. She had a large, discolored indentation – at least an inch wide and an inch deep – on the right side of her forehead.

  • Wade settles suit against CUB

    The former CEO of Citizen Union Bank has settled his lawsuit against the bank.

    CUB and Billie Wade, who served as president and CEO from 1991 until March 2010, have settled a wrongful termination and defamation suit Wade filed in July 2010.

    A mediator’s report, submitted to Shelby Circuit Court on Feb. 13, contained no details of the settlement, saying merely that, “all claims among the parties have been settled.”

  • Catholics hold vigil to protest ‘freedom’ issue

    Ash Wednesday’s prayer and fasting extended into Thursday for Catholics in Shelby County who attended the candlelight vigil Thursday night at the Church of the Annunciation.

    Pastor Mike Tobin said there was no better time to for Catholics to stand behind the church’s stance against the requirement that free birth control be included in health plans for employees of schools, charities and hospitals connected to religiously affiliated institutions.

  • 2 events celebrate Black History Month

    It looks like Shelby County waited until the very last minute to celebrate Black History Month – but that could be changing.

    February is designated each year as a time to for communities to focus on African-American history, but in Shelby County that never has had great traction.

    There are two upcoming events: a heritage dinner Sunday morning at New Mount Zion Baptist Church and an educational forum at Bethel AME Church on Thursday – March 1.