Local News

  • Shelby County farms have fewer horses in the fields

    As is the case with most horse breeds, fewer and fewer Saddlebreds are being produced on a national scale than even a few years ago. But many farm owners in Shelby County have kept the breeding wheels turning so they can be ready when the market eventually rebounds.

    Annual registrations of Saddlebreds, which reached an estimated low of 1,930 in 2010, have declined 33.6 percent since 2000, according to data supplied by the American Saddlebred Registry.

  • These are Shelby County's studs of Saddlebred breeding

    Behind the four-board fences of some farms in Shelby County is a swirling beehive of activity collectively aimed at getting Saddlebred horses ready to strut their stuff in show arenas across the country.

    But the genesis of these equine athletes begins with multifaceted breeding programs offered by the Saddlebred industry, a diverse mix of elements that boils down to pairing the right stallion with the right broodmare.

  • Smith named SCPS deputy superintendent

    Lisa Smith is moving on and up but not out of Shelby County Public Schools.

    Effective July 1, Smith will move from director of student programs to chief academic officer/deputy superintendent for SCPS.

    Smith, who has been a teacher in Franklin County and a principal and administrator in Shelby, said originally leaving the classroom was difficult.

  • Teen’s ‘confession’ leads to rape charges

    A man is in jail under a $150,000 cash bond after being arrested for first-degree rape and sodomy of a child.

    Abel V. Gomez, 29, was arrested April 18 at the McDonald’s restaurant on Frankfort Road after the pastor of a teen-aged girl reported to a child abuse hotline the details of what the pastor said she had told him, police said.

  • EARLIER: Accused murder Gary Bancroft indicted as persistent felony offender

    LAWRENCEBURG ­– The man suspected of slicing his girlfriend’s throat and stuffing her body into a trash bag last fall was indicted Wednesday as a persistent felony offender, according to documents on file in Anderson Circuit Court.

    Gary Bancroft is charged with first-degree murder and tampering with evidence in the death of Frances Renee Mobley, who was found dead at Bancroft’s residence last September.

  • News Briefs: April 27, 2011

    Triple S sets public hearing to review 7th Street corridor

    The Triple S Planning Commission has received the Shelbyville 7th Street Corridor Plan from the City Solutions Center and will be holding a public hearing at 6:30 p.m. May 17.

  • Superintendent evaluated as ‘excellent’

    Usually it’s the student who gets a report card, but last week it was the superintendent’s turn.

    For the second year in a row, James Neihof scored an “excellent” on the Shelby County Board  of Education’s annual superintendent’s evaluation, which was submitted at the board’s meeting Thursday night.

  • Overnight storms spare Shelby

    Some dangerous overnight storms dumped rain and brought high winds to Shelby County, but residents awoke to a welcome and startingly bright sunshine for the first time in more than a week.

    Several potentially dangerous formations passed over the county in the night, and so far there have been no reports of damage.

    Skies cleared early, and though there is a chance for more storms today and tonight, conditions should be favorable until at least Monday.

  • Former Spencer County Judge-Exec gets home incarceration for DUI

    Former Spencer County Judge Executive David Jenkins was ordered to undergo 10 days of home incarceration after being found guilty of DUI after a jury trial in Shelby County District Court Thursday.

    Jenkins’s trial was ordered moved from Spencer County in November by Special Judge Jerry Crosby II, who ordered the case moved to Shelby County because he didn’t think the case could be argued fairly in Spencer.

  • Simpsonville may increase sewer rates 1st time in 18 years

    Simpsonville residents could be getting their first increase in sewer rates in 18 years.

    The Simpsonville City Commission on Wednesday morning approved the first reading of an ordinance that would raise rates 2.5 percent, an increase officials said was needed to cover rising costs during a time when new construction has declined.

    Rates would rise from $10.15 for the first 2,000 gallons of usage to $10.40 and from 5.075 to 5.202 per 1,000 gallons thereafter.