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Local News

  • County looks to trim more than $400,000

    The feeling was cautiously optimistic Tuesday morning when Shelby County Fiscal Court approved a first reading an amended budget that took a more than $400,000 slice out of its operating budget.

    Despite that, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said he was not displeased, because though some substantial cuts were made, several took the county out of what he called its “comfort zone,” because it removed any cushion from the categories affected.

    The cuts magistrates approved include:

  • Shelby families feared worst in Japan's tragedy

    Days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan’s northern coastal cities, some Shelby County families remain numb with shock and weak with relief that their loved ones are safe.

    But some of them didn’t know that immediately and say the natural inclination to think the worst kicked in after they saw horrible images of death and destruction on television newscasts from Japan, where the death toll already numbers in the thousands and could climb as high as 10,000.

  • Precautions taken in Kentucky for potential quakes

    Shelby County Emergency Management Agency Director Charlie Frazee said that although Kentucky is situated near the New Madrid Seismic Zone, earthquakes that could occur in this area are not likely to be as catastrophic as the one that hit Japan.

    Nevertheless, he said he would  be taking part in an earthquake training seminar to held this spring.

  • EARLIER: Shelby County still pursuing Anderson County jail deal

    Shelby County Jailer Bobby Waits was scheduled to attend the Anderson County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday night to discuss the idea of striking a deal to house prisoners from Anderson at the Shelby County Detention Center.

    Anderson Jailer Joani Clark and Waits had said last week that they were discussing such a move because Clark is dissatisfied with an arrangement she has with Franklin County Jailer Billy Roberts.

  • School year shortened by 2 days

    The Shelby County Board of Education voted Thursday to shorten the 2010-11 school calendar, with the last day for students now being June 3.
    The date is being moved up from June 7 because the district built in a much higher number of days and instructional hours than the state requirements.
    After the district missed several days this school year due to inclement weather, the board unanimously decided to reduce the school calendar which includes 175 6-hour days.

  • What happens in Shelby if U.S. shuts down?

    The looming potential of a federal government shutdown next Friday has people worried nationwide.

    Federal agencies could be charged with identifying essential programs and personnel, and several programs, offices and services could be shut down while Congress tries to agree on budget cuts for the upcoming fiscal year.

    And so far the programs that could be affected are being kept in the dark.

  • New zoning request won't merit new study

    The Triple S Planning Commission will cover an old topic at a new location when it meets on Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.

    Because of improvements being made at the Stratton Center, this month's Triple S meeting will be held in the Tulip Room at Shelbyville City Hall.

    There are just three items of new business, two concerning Equestrian Lakes North, the newest portion of the subdivision.

    The developers have reworked the preliminary plat of the subdivision that boarders Clark Station Road and KY 148.

  • Shelby County Animal Shelter: Too many dogs, not enough food, lots of help

    With an overcrowded population and short on funding, James Collins, an animal control officer with the Shelby County Animal Shelter, turned to the community for help.

    And in a matter of hours they responded.

    "We have had a huge response," Collins said about an E-mail he sent yesterday requesting help with dog food. The shelter currently has nearly 70 dogs, but is set up with just 30 kennel runs.

  • Montell, Hornback not optimistic about session

    Shelby County’s lawmakers say they can see what’s going on in the General Assembly, and they’re not hopeful that even the special session Gov. Steve Beshear called for Monday will find a solution to the messy Medicaid impasse they are facing.

    Beshear called this special session – the ninth since 2001 – to fix a $166 million gap in the Medicaid budget that, if not addressed, he said would cause at least 30 percent rate cuts to Medicaid providers in the next fiscal year, which starts July 1.

  • New signs of times on I-64

    There’s a bit of a civil war breaking out in eastern Shelby County, and the first shot wasn’t even heard.

    This is about Waddy and Peytona – or is it Peytona and Waddy? – neighbors along KY 395, which crosses Interstate 64 about 10 miles east of Shelbyville.

    You may not have noticed, but if you travel eastbound on I-64, new signs placed there by the state now list the exit for “Peytona/Waddy” rather than giving Waddy the top billing it has had since the exit opened in the late 1950s.