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Local News

  • Schools to expand engineering and biomedical courses

    Shelby County Public Schools continue to lead the way in engineering and biomedical science classes.

    The district learned this week that the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) courses will continue to expand at Collins and Shelby County high schools.

    Shelby County is one of just 17 schools to earn the $50,000 biomedical sciences grant, and Collins is one of just four to earn the grant in engineering and one of only three to earn an additional $25,000 grant for a gateway to engineering track for eighth-grade students.

  • News Briefs: April 15, 2011

    Kentucky’s unemployment

    down .2 of a percent in March

  • Unknown person saves horse from burning barn

    A horse in foal was rescued Tuesday from a barn fire in Simpsonville by an unknown person.

    Linda Bennett of Alliance Stud, who owns the horse, said when she found out that a passerby had resuced "Greta" from the fire, she and her husband, Scott Bennett, who owns Equine Services, were amazed.

    She added that she and her husband would really like to find out who the person is so they can thank him.

    The fire broke out at about 3 p.m. Tuesday.

  • Kentucky voter registration deadline is Monday

    Monday is the final day to register to vote in the Primary Election, which is May 17.

    Qualified residents 18 and older may register at the Shelby County Clerk’s office no later than 4:30 p.m. on Monday.

    This election will include only statewide races, with the highest profile being the showdown between Republicans Phil Moffett and David Williams in their bid to face incumbent Gov. Steve Beshear in November.

  • News Briefs: April 13, 2011

    Wives of Beshear, Abramson
    at event here on Thursday

    Jane Beshear, wife of Gov. Steve Beshear, and Madeline Abramson, wife of Jerry Abramson, Beshear’s lieutenant runningmate for the Democrats in the 2011 election, will be stopping in Shelbyville on Thursday.
    Beshear and Abramson will be part of a meet-and-greet session to be held at 4 p.m. at Through the Looking Glass, located at 629 Washington St.
    The event is geared toward women in Shelby County who are in a position of leadership.

  • City of Shelbyville plans to buy old Blue Gables Motel

    The city of Shelbyville could be looking to get into commercial property.

    The city is working with the Kentuckiana Regional Planning & Development Agency (KIPDA) on a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) that would allow the city to purchase the old Blue Gables Motel on the corner of 8th and Main streets.

    Mark Stivers, who owns the property, did not return phone calls Tuesday, but Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said the city is looking at the possible acquisition as an opportunity.

  • Rubles ask city to annex property

    The City of Shelbyville could grow by more than 70 acres in next to no time.

    Fresh on the heels of voting to annex the property where Bluegrass Bowling Center currently sits, the Shelbyville City Council soon will be voting on another annexation, this time on the northwest side of Shelbyville.

    Tom and Allen Ruble have sent a letter to the city asking for annexation of about 70 acres zoned agricultural that sits just west of the Shelbyville Bypass and south of Harrington Mill Road.

  • Noted author to speak at library

    Gurney Norman will be the guest author 6-7 p.m. Thursday for a third in the series of “Spend an Evening with....” at the Shelby County Public Library.

    He is a charter member of the faculty of the Hindman Settlement School’s Writers Workshop and continues to serve as a senior writer in residence for that annual event.

  • Japan fundraiser leaves organizer ‘disappointed’

    The one-woman whirlwind to generate some money to aid earthquake-savaged Japan had her own world shaken a bit on Saturday.

    The bake sale Mallory Taylor organized at the Waldridge Center generated only light traffic and a few hundred dollars worth of donations.

    “I was a little disappointed,” she said. “I went home and cried.”

    Taylor had started a campaign to raise money to donate through the American Red Cross.

  • Soldiers finally honored in ‘hallowed ground’

    On a warm, crystal clear, almost muggy spring day – quite different from the day when they died – 22 long-forgotten African-American soldiers were laid to proper rest in a skillfully created memorial alongside U.S. 60 near Simpsonville.

    A crowd of perhaps 150 was on hand Sunday as project manager Jerry Miller and a group of dignitaries celebrated the final resting of the member of the 5th U.S. Colored Cavalry who died in ambush by Confederate guerillas as they drove cattle to Louisville in January 1865.