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Local News

  • EARLIER: Shelby’s ACT scores decline

    The ACT scores among juniors in Shelby County fell behind those of the state and most surrounding counties in 2011 – just one year after they had showed significant gains.

    Shelby County Public Schools’ average composite score among juniors fell from 18.7 in 2010 to 18.5, which lags the state's average (18.8).

    School districts in Oldham (21.5), Eminence (20.9), Scott (19.9), Franklin (19) and Spencer (18.7) all had better scores, and Henry and Jefferson counties matched Shelby, with Henry and Jefferson both improving to the 18.5.

  • Shelby County schools have smooth first day

    Other than a few tears from children and parents alike, Shelby County Public Schools had a smooth opening day on Wednesday for the 2011-12 school year.

    Lisa Smith, the district deputy superintendent, was at Heritage Elementary bright and early Wednesday morning, and she noted how well things were coming together.

    "Everything is going very smooth; the students are all very happy and excited,” she said. “And the weather is just beautiful. It's a perfect day to start school."

  • Triple S Planning Commission: Zone change on 7 Mile Pike: Lots of comment, approval

    For the second meeting in a row the Triple S Planning Commission faced a zone change request, and commissioners again recommended a change that they will send to Shelby County Fiscal Court for approval.

    Although less controversial than the request by Midwest Metals on Kentucky Street, the request for a zone change from Interchange (IC) and Agricultural zones to a newer Interchange (X-2) zone did rile up residents near the location at the east corner of 7 Mile Pike and KY 2258, which leads back to the state maintenance garage.

  • Clarence Miller: 1912-2011

    Clarence Miller achieved much in his life before passing away Wednesday night at the age of 98, but his true legacy might be his deep love for his community.

    That love is most evidenced by his generous donation of his 133-acre family farm to Shelby County, which is now known as Red Orchard Park. His nephew, Lowry Miller, said that gift was his uncle’s way of letting the entire community know how much he cared.

  • Phillips family back home

    All surviving members of the Shelbyville family who were involved in a tragic traffic accident in Florida earlier this month are out of the hospital and back home to try to return some normalcy to their lives.

    Nearly two weeks after Carolyn Phillips, 32, and her son, Devin Miller, 13, were killed, their lives will be celebrated and their remains laid to rest this weekend.

  • Simpsonville City Commission considers property tax bump

    The Simpsonville City Commission passed on first reading at its meeting Wednesday morning a 9.3 percent increase in property taxes for this fiscal year.

    The rate, if passed on second reading, would be set at 10.6 cents per $100 or assessed value – up from .097 in 2010 – or the equivalent increase of .009 cents, or about $9 per year increase on a home with a $100,000 tax value.

  • 8 women, 6 men on jury in penis amputation case

    The jury in the trial of a man suing his surgeon for amputating his penis was chosen Thursday, with eight women and six men seated to hear arguments and testimony starting Monday in Shelby Circuit Court.

    The 12 jurors and two alternates will consider the complaint of Waddy resident Phillip Seaton, 62, who says Dr. John Patterson amputated his penis without his consent during a circumcision in 2007. Seaton claims he awoke from the procedure to discover his penis had been amputated.

  • Prominent Shelby resident Clarence Miller passes

    Clarence Miller, onetime agriculture attache to Spain and a benefactor of Shelby County, passed away Wednesday night. He was 98.

    Miller had been ill for the past couple of weeks and had moved among his managed care residence to the hospital and to a rehab facility. He had been hospitalized late last week with penumonia.

    Miller had been a prominent agriculture official internationally, and he served presidents and industry for decades.

  • News briefs: Aug. 17, 2011

    Bagdad Ruritans holding dinner

    to try to keep the city’s lights on

     

    The Bagdad Ruritan Club is trying to keep the streetlights burning in the city, but its members are going to need some help.

    Bagdad has for about 50 years had a resident-pay system for its streetlights, and because of non-payment and rising costs, the fund for those lights has dried up.

  • SCPS in court on road dispute

    As Shelby County Public Schools welcomes students back to classes today, some members of the administration may be in court.

    The district's lawsuit against WAZE Development for breach of contract in an agreement to extend Discovery Boulevard to Midland Industrial – for an outlet to Freedom's Way – is scheduled to be heard in Shelby County Circuit Court.