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Local News

  • EMS moves closer to cool new home

    Emergency Services Director Todd Early gave Shelby County Fiscal Court an update Tuesday on progress in EMS’s move into its new headquarters.

    The county last year purchased for $650,000 from Schwan Food Service a 5.5-acre facility at 101 Old 7 Mile Pike, and EMS will relocate this year from the building it has outgrown on Hospital Drive in Shelbyville.

    “The conveyor system has been removed, and the electric doors have been replaced; now we just need to remove the cooler,” he said.

  • Shelby County's uniform policy similar to others in region

    When you see a county employee at work, you likely will be seeing clothing that you bought and maybe even cleaned with your tax dollars.

    That’s because Shelby County spends $52,750 annually to buy work clothes for its employees, ranging from T-shirts and lightweight jackets to a complete uniform for deputies and jailers.

    That doesn’t make Shelby unique. All other neighboring counties surveyed by The Sentinel-Newshave programs to provide clothing and sometimes laundry services for their employees, too.

  • Whitman takes over as director of EMA

    Shelby County has a new emergency management agency director, but it’s not a new face: Long-time Deputy Director Paul Whitman, who has been serving as interim director since the retirement of Charlie Frazee in October, takes over.
    Whitman was sworn in by Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger at Tuesday’s meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court at the Stratton Center.

    Whitman was appointed deputy emergency director in 2003, just a year after fiscal court established the local EMA with Frazee at the helm.

  • News briefs: Jan. 18, 2012

    Dramatic cuts expected

    in state’s 2-year budget

    Kentucky Gov. Steve Beshear was to address the General Assembly on Tuesday night with a message that is likely to detail spending cuts of 7 to 9 percent for the next 2-year state budget.

  • Shelby County has light damage from Tuesday’s storms

    Less than an hour after Shelby County’s new emergency management director was sworn in, the county’s severe weather sirens began wailing.

    No, it was not in honor of Paul Whitman’s new post that tornado warnings were issued around 11 a.m. Tuesday.

    The storms, which produced wind gusts as high as 85 miles per hour, according to National Weather Service Meteorologist Joe Sullivan, roared across Indiana and Jefferson County, damaging homes, overturning trucks on Interstate 265 and flattening trees.

  • Boil-water mandate is lifted

    Shelbyville Water Company officials lifted the boil-water advisory in downtown Shelbyville at about 7:30 p.m. Saturday.

    Officials said they had conducted tests on the water quality in the vicinity of 11th and Main Streets, where a water-main break on Friday had forced the advisory, and found it free of bacteria.

    The break, which had affected residents and traffic flow since Friday morning, was repaired as of late Friday night and traffic lanes reopened.

  • Woman jailed for animal abuse wants some of them returned

    NEW CASTLE – Terri L. Smith made her first court appearance Monday since being arraigned on 218 counts of second-degree animal abuse stemming from the Dec. 12 puppy mill/animal hoarding bust at her home in rural Campbellsburg.
    Judge Diana Wheeler gave Henry County Attorney Virginia Harrod until Feb. 6 to respond to a request for discovery, filed by Smith’s attorney, George R. Carter, of Louisville, and scheduled the next pretrial hearing for Feb. 20.

  • Shelbyville City Council: Window closing on zone change review

    The Shelbyville City Council's push to have 70-plus acres of farmland rezoned to light industrial appears to be coming to an end – at least for now.

    The city has until Monday to review a recommendation by the Triple S Planning Commission on Oct. 18 that the property, at the corner of the Harrington Mill Road and Freedom’s Way, remain zoned agricultural, or that recommendation goes into effect.

    As of Thursday evening, Mayor Tom Hardesty said no meetings are planned, and city government is closed on Monday in recognition of Martin Luther King Day.

  • 2 Collins students arrested in Facebook-hacking incident

    An incident involving three Collins High School students and Facebook left school and county officials worried about possible problems during the school day on Wednesday.

    Two students had learned another students' login and password for a Facebook account and posted a racial slur as her status update.

    After several threatening comments were posted on the site, school officials and the Shelby County Sheriff's office were alerted to the situation and that the girl did not post the comment.

  • Young’s new event highlights MLK Day

    The Whitney M. Young Job Crops Center is hoping to start an annual event with its first Martin Luther King Jr. Educational and Basketball Tournament this weekend.

    "This is the first time, but, if it turns out well, we're hoping it can be an annual event," said Felicia Lee, the business and community liaison for the center.

    The participants are from three other Job Corps centers, Pittsburgh, New Haven, Conn., and Cassadega, N.Y.

    But the event is much more than a 4-team basketball tournament.