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Local News

  • Tingle named new Simpsonville Elementary principal

    Simpsonville Elementary -- meet the Tingles.

    When its Site-Based Decision-Making Council unanimously agreed last Wednesday that Jill Tingle was a perfect fit for the position of Simpsonville Elementary Principal, that group may not have realized that she'll be heading to work with half of her family by her side.

  • 'We're living in poop'

    Monthly rent and water bill: $420

    Cleaning gloves and bleach: $20

    Scrubbing the bathtub clean only to have it once again fill up with raw sewage five minutes later: Disgusting.

    If something smells off at Wesley Apartments, check the plumbing.

    "We're living in poop," said resident Kristy Griffith. "There's no other way of saying it."

    For the last two weeks, Griffith said toilets have been burping and bathtubs have been backing up with sewage in many of the C-apartments at Wesley Apartments off of Midland Trail.

  • Courthouse beset by fowl situation

    Some describe it as slimy; some call it nasty and disgusting.

    But everyone agrees that the sidewalk outside the back door of the Shelby County Courthouse is not sanitary.

    The reason: piles of pigeon droppings.

    But the pigeons that call the courthouse ledges home soon may have a bird's-eye view of a different perch if county officials have their way.

    Shelby County Deputy Judge-Executive Rusty Newton said the county is - once again - devising a plan to make the birds flock together someplace else.

  • Health care debate hits very close to home

    While Congress is busy debating major health care reform in Washington, some Shelby County residents have become part of what they call a grassroots effort to make their thoughts known. Joy Tabler is making phone calls to Congressmen and collecting signatures this week opposing proposed cuts to Medicare and its funding of in-home health care. Tabler is the patient care liaison for Caretenders, a home health care provider on Alpine Drive. She said home health care keeps patients in their homes and out of expensive health care facilities, such as hospi

  • News Briefs: Aug. 12, 2009

    Bypass work could cause some delays, rerouting

    The construction of the Shelbyville Bypass could cause some disruptions in the areas of Harrington Mill Road, LaGrange Road and Midland Industrial Parkway. A State Transportation Cabinet briefing said some motorists could be delayed or rerouted around ongoing work.

    Also, two work projects on I-64 in Shelby County continue.

  • News Briefs: Aug. 7, 2009

    Grant applications

  • Shelbyville 2009 tax rates to stay level

    Shelbyville's property tax rates will likely remain the same for yet another year.

    Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance Thursday night, levying ad valorem property tax rates for the calendar year of 2009.

    The tax rate proposed this year is 27.5 cents per $100 assessed real property. The rate is expected to produce $1,972,111 - nearly $16,000 more than last year.

  • List of 'domestic' pets set by council

    Shelbyville City Council amended an existing ordinance relating to the keeping of animals in the city limits to better define what animals are considered "domestic pets." That list includes: domestic dog, cat, rabbit, guinea pig, chinchilla, hamster, gerbil, ferret. The proposed list originally included mouse, rat, and reptile but the council decided to scratch those from the list.

    Non-domestic animals are not necessarily banned from the city, but they do face restrictions -- like having to be contained in a clean pin at least 100 feet away from the property line.

  • Hicks headed to North Oldham

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  • City council holds line on property taxes

    Shelbyville City Council approved the first reading of an ordinance Thursday night levying ad valorem property tax rates for the calendar year of 2009.

    The tax rate proposed this year is 27.5 cents per $100 assessed real property, which is the same as it has been the last two years.  

    The tax is expected to produce $1,972,111 in revenue – nearly $60,000 more than last year.