Local News

  • Spencer, Anderson matching Shelby’s synthetic drug effort

    TAYLORSVILLE – The Spencer County Fiscal Court – much like its counterpart in Shelby County – is scheduled to hear the second reading of an ordinance that would ban the possession and sale of synthetic marijuana countywide.

    The ordinance passed unanimously on first reading last week.

    Shelby County Fiscal Court passed first reading of a nearly identical ordinance on Feb. 21. Casey County also has taken that step. Neither is a coincidence.

  • News briefs: Feb. 29, 2012

    Legislators now at odds

    on when to redraw districts


    The state House and Senate appear to be at odds on when to redraw legislative district lines. Senate Majority Leader Robert Stivers (R-Manchester) told The Herald-Leaderin Lexington that the Senate would prefer to continue to tackle the contentious issue of redistricting before this legislative session ends April 15.

  • Some students struggling with Accelerated Academy’s AP courses

    Although Shelby County Public Schools’ officials have been pleased with the first semester of new Accelerated Academy, they also have identified a few areas for improvement.

    In a report to the school board on Thursday, Chief Academic Officer/Deputy Superintendent Lisa Smith said with proper tweaks, the district would see even more enthusiasm for the program, which began with 62 students in this year’s freshmen classes (37 at Collins, 25 at Shelby County).

  • Shelby County School Board: MAP scores show disappointing trend

    The Shelby County Board of Education received some disappointing information as the district marches toward the first of its BIG Goals this year.

    The district’s winter Measure of Academic Progress (MAP) test results revealed that the schools have a long way to go to ensure that every student entering middle school next year be on or above grade level in math and reading.

  • Tenants get water, power

    Tenants living in properties owned and maintained by Wood Properties have been getting some good news since late last week.

    "We got our water turned back on Friday, and our power is back on now, too," said Fred Harrington, a renter at 908 Main St. in Shelbyville. "Everybody [at the other locations] has everything turned back on."

    Several properties owned by Wood had lost water and power despite residents having paid their rent, which was supposed to cover all utilities.

  • Hornback’s bill would loosen telecom regs

    If you are one of the ever-dwindling homes with a traditional land telephone line, you may have to start looking for an alternative.

    Senate Bill 135, also referred to as the "AT&T Bill," is scheduled to come up before the Senate next week and appears to have the needed support.

    Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville), the sponsor of the bill, said he has worked closely with the Public Service Commission to make sure its officials agree with the bill and that the residents of the commonwealth will continue to have adequate phone service.

  • Bagdad woman charged in thefts

    Kentucky State Police Detectives have charged a Bagdad woman with embezzling more than $115,000 from her employer.

    A Shelby County Grand Jury indicted Linda C. Poole, 57, of 7345 Elmburg  Road in a total of 20 counts related to thefts from Amen East, an auto salvage business in Bagdad.

    The indictments were for 2 counts of theft by unlawful taking under $10,000; 11 counts of theft by unlawful taking over $10,000 and 7 counts of second-degree criminal possession of a forged instrument.

  • Fairway Crossing residents to make noise about noise

    Some residents along Interstate 64 are taking a concern about a noisy future to the Shelbyville City Council for its meeting on Thursday night.

    Members of the Fairway Crossing Homeowners Association off Mount Eden Road are concerned about how widening plans for I-64 might affect the tranquility of their neighborhood by bringing more noise closer to their doors and windows.

    They want their concerns heard by council members, and a spokesperson for the group is on the agenda for the meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall.

  • Hurt leaves Shelbyville PD for Simpsonville

    The Shelbyville Police Department’s loss is Simpsonville’s gain.

    Tim Hurt was sworn in Monday as the newest police officer in Simpsonville, moving there after a 3-plus-year stint with the Shelbyville Police Department.

    Hurt, 47, a resident of Lawrenceburg, took Kentucky’s ancient oath – including swearing that he never had fought a duel – from Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden, as his wife, Karen Hurt, and friend Stewart Shirley watched. He immediately went to work in required CPR and AED refresher classes.

  • ‘Puppy mill’ case will go to trial

    EMINENCE: The Henry County woman charged with more than 200 counts of animal cruelty will take her case to trial.

    On Monday Terri L. Smith of Campbellsburg, through her attorney, asked for a jury trial in her case, which consists of 218 counts of first degree animal cruelty, a Class A misdemeanor.

    Henry County Attorney Virginia Harrod said Smith’s attorney, George Carter, arrived for Monday’s hearing and immediately requested a jury trial.