.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Building Shelby Part 1: State is building new centers

    Since its judicial center construction program began in 2000, the AOC has had such projects approved for half of the commonwealth’s 120 counties. Many projects have been for new, standalone buildings, but some have been for courthouse additions and renovations.

    Of the 40 projects approved since 2005, only seven were done in counties larger than Shelby. And of those 24 have been completed, and 16 remain in various stages of construction.

    The seven larger projects, their counties, costs, square footage and date of completion are:

  • News briefs: Dec. 14, 2011

    School districts receive bad news
    about $57.5 million educational shortfall

    Local school officials around Kentucky will soon find out how much money they stand to lose in a $57.5 million shortfall to state education funding.
    Education Commissioner Terry Holliday told superintendents in an E-mail Friday that the Kentucky Department of Education would announce mid-year cuts later this month, The State-Journal reported.

  • Ethington Autos owners go before licensing group

    The owners of Ethington Auto, already under indictment on 169 counts for failure to process paperwork properly on the sale of autos, now will have to face the Kentucky Motor Vehicle Commission on Thursday.
    Donnie Ethington, 70, of Shelbyville and William Ledford, 84, of Somerset were indicted this past summer. Two of the charges were felonies, for selling or receiving cars with removed or altered VIN numbers, and the rest were all misdemeanors.

  • Building Shelby Part 1: Entering building to be like airport

    When Shelby County’s new judicial center opens on Monday, people will find that security will be at a much higher level.

    In fact, Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong, said it will like nothing the county has every experienced previously in that regard.

    “Make no mistake about it, it will be an extremely secure facility,” he said.

    “It will take some getting used to, both for us and for the public. People have been used to just going into the courthouse in a casual manner and that is no longer going to be case.”

  • Police hold coat drive

    The Shelbyville Police Department teamed up recently with Sam Meyers Cleaners in Shelbyville to help needy families have warm coats to wear this winter.

    Shelbyville Police Chief Robert Schutte said the event was a project undertaken by the department’s advisory board, which collects more than 50 coats plus numerous sweaters and blankets for the needy.

  • Gov. Steve Beshear’s 2011 inaugural address

    Thank you, Jane, for your love and support, and for being such a great First Lady.  Thank you to our sons, Jeff and Andy, and their families, for making us so proud.

    And thank you to Jerry, Madeline and Sidney Abramson, for agreeing to join us in leading this state over the next four years.

    ***

    We began this day with solemn prayer, and we will bring it to an end, late this evening, with ceremonial music and dancing.  Inaugurations, after all, are a collage of tradition and hope.

  • Beshear’s second-term goals: Create jobs, help kids

    FRANKFORT – Ignoring overcast skies and chilly temperatures, Gov. Steve Beshear shared his vision for tomorrow with Kentuckians during his inaugural speech Tuesday afternoon on the capitol’s steps.
    Beshear became only the second Kentucky governor in modern times to serve consecutive terms. Paul Patton was the first.

  • Shelbyville to consider annexing railroad along Rubles’ land

    The Shelbyville City Council, rebuffed earlier this fall in its effort to get a newly annexed piece of property rezoned, on Thursday will consider an ordinance to annex a section of the railroad that separates that property from an industrial park.

    If the ordinance passes two readings, the segment of RJ Corman Railroad’s tracks that is the buffer between a 73-acre parcel owned by Shelby County Magistrate Allen Ruble and his brother and the Midland Industrial Park would become part of the city.

  • Parks gets grant for planned facility

    This sketch depicts the designed of the planned activity center at Shelby Trails Park, located on Aiken Road in Todds Point. The facility, which will be funded with a $50,000 Land and Water Conservation Fund grant, will serve as a bath and shower house with a small office, meeting and store room that will serve the primitive and RV campgrounds at the park. The park is a natural park dedicated to horseback riding and trails.

  • Man charged with molestation gets hearing date

    A hearing for a Shelby County man charged with multiple counts of child molestation has been rescheduled for January.

    Henry Telles, 25, was arrested May 12 at a residence on Spruce Drive where he temporarily was staying and charged with first-degree rape, first-degree sodomy and two counts of first-degree sexual abuse against two girls, ages 9 and 13 years old at the time, for whom his wife was caring.