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Local News

  • 'Basics' help hospital fight superbug

    While some doctors say the C. diff “superbug” is becoming a bigger problem for hospitals across the country, officials at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville say it’s on the decline among their patients because they’ve gone “back to the basics.”

  • Ramp closings on I-64 this week

     If you travel I-64 around Shelbyville during the evening or early morning hours, you might have to find some alternate routes.

    The repaving project that has been under way between the Simpsonville and KY 55 (Taylorsville Road) exit will expand to cause some ramp closings during the next few nights.

    Here’s what the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet says you can expect:

  • High school math could be more accessible for qualified middle school students

    The Shelby County Public School Board recently waived an existing policy to allow a single, upcoming seventh-grader to take a high school math class this year for credit toward graduation.

    That policy was set so that only eighth-graders who had mastered their middle school math content could take high school level algebra early.

    The board waived it once, and soon it may be waived for good.

  • High school math now open to all qualifying middle school students

    The Shelby County Public Schools Board declared a positive first reading Thursday of policy 08.113, which would to allow all middle school students who qualify to take high school level algebra early for credit toward graduation.

    The policy had limited the possibility to eighth-graders who had mastered middle school math, but last month the board waived the policy so a single upcoming seventh-grader could take algebra I for high school credit. That got Superintendent James Neihof thinking.

  • News Briefs: Aug. 14, 2009

     

     Andrews to address Rotary

    Rodney Andrews, the director of the Center for Applied Energy Research (CAER) at the University of Kentucky, will speak to the Shelbyville Rotary Club noon Tuesday at Centenary United Methodist Church. Andrews will describe CAER's place in energy Issues. He will be introduced by Shelbyville Rotarian Tom Sorrell, who is the president-elect of the club. Rotary meets Tuesdays at noon at the Centenary United Methodist Church, corner of Washington and Fifth streets.

  • Guthrie visiting Shelby on Friday

    U.S. Rep. Brett Guthrie (R-Bowling Green) will be in Shelbyville on Friday to meet with citizens at a variety of events as part of a tour of the district he is completing during Congress’s summer break.

    Guthrie will make four appearances to address Shelby Countians about his first term in office and progress on issues they may find important.

    The key will be a session at 3:30 when he will spend about an hour taking questions from the public during an event at the Kentucky Farm Bureau office on Mount Eden Road.

  • EARLIER: Bypass contractor loaded with jobs

    State officials’ dissatisfaction with the contractors working on the Shelbyville Bypass hasn’t stopped that company from winning and beginning nearly $142 million in state contracts since 2005. Kay and Kay Contracting, which began construction on the bypass in May 2006, has 11 other open contracts with the Transportation Cabinet and since May 1 has started seven more projects to build highways and related structures. Kay and Kay has completed just 56 percent of the 4.5-mile road that would connect Kentucky 55

  • Shelby Energy ‘improving safety practices’

    Audit results are in, and it appears electricity and gas provider Shelby Energy Cooperative is making strides in improving work safety. The co-op underwent a state audit in 2008 after Cosby Carroll, an employee of Dobson Power, a former contractor of Shelby Energy, fell to his death from an bucket truck on Nov. 12, 2007.

  • EARLIER: Bypass construction stalled by weather

    Construction on the Shelbyville Bypass has all but come to a standstill, and state officials say it's because the county had such a rainy spring.

    "It's been raining, and even when it stops, they've got to wait for the ground to dry out," said Andrea Clifford, public information officer for the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet.

  • EARLIER: First day at new school just another challenge for Patterson

    Seventeen-year-old Brittany Patterson has moved to Finchville to be with family and become a senior at Shelby County High School. Like any teen in that situation, she's nervous. She won't know anybody at school and isn't familiar with the facility. She's the new kid.

    But the adventure is also one Patterson is eager to embark. After all, she has spent her life facing challenges that most teens never could imagine.