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Local News

  • Woman poisoned by gas improving

    A Shelby County woman hospitalized for two weeks  after being overcome by carbon monoxide, is beginning to show signs of recovery.

    Jennifer Lewis, 35, who was discovered unconscious along with four family members at her home on Beech Street in the Meadowbrook subdivision on Jan. 27, remains unconscious at Jewish Hospital Louisville, Shelby County Sheriff’s Detective Jason Rice said, but family members are expressing more hope in recent days.

  • Animal groups unite for fund raising event

    The groups that support animal care in Shelby County are getting together Saturday for their first joint fundraiser, and those animals may be getting a big boost.

    Only a handful of tickets remain for Monarchs, Mutts and Meows at Claudia Sanders Dinner House, which will benefit five groups that support the no-kill efforts in Shelby County.

  • News Briefs: Feb. 9, 2011

    Survey says Kentuckians
    support rights for gays

    Some 83 percent of Kentuckians say gay people should be protected from discrimination in the workplace, in housing and in public places such as restaurants, according to a survey released Monday by the statewide Fairness Coalition. That is an increase of 18 percentage points since 2004, when a similar survey was conducted.

  • Board will close out Heritage sewer issue

    The Shelby County Board of Education will close out a big project at its regular meeting on Thursday, but it's not Collins High School yet.

    The board will consider approval of closing the Sewage Treatment Plant Replacement project at Heritage Elementary during their meeting at 7 p.m. at Clear Creek Elementary.

    The process started about a year-and-a-half ago when it was found that the maintenance and upkeep of the old treatment plant was going to cost more than a new one. The old plant had been moved to Heritage from Wright Elementary.

  • Census will bring changes

     

  • Duck hunters support habitats

    Ducks hunters in Shelby County should be pleased with the turnout at a banquet to promote that sport, said Chris Cottongim, chairman of the Shelby County chapter of Ducks Unlimited.

    Cottongim said he does not know how many members of this national organization there are statewide, but there are about 200 in Shelby County.

    He said he was pleased that more than half that number showed up for the Ducks Unlimited banquet at Claudia Sanders Dinner House on Friday night. The event included a live auction, which raised $14,259  for the organization.

  • Crash shuts down I-64 for 4 hours

     

  • EARLIER: Sidewalk debate: Both sides moving

    The Shelbyville City Council heard the blueprint for its much-debated plan to require property owners to repair their sidewalks this spring.

    Mayor Tom Hardesty asked Public Works Director/City Engineer Jennifer Herrell to explain the plan to the council at Thursday's meeting. Herrell said her schedule would follow last year's set date of April 1.

  • Schools on 2-hour delay

    Shelby County schools are operating on a 2-hour delay this morning after falling temperatures overnight caused slick spots on some roads.

    Shelby County received an inch plus of snow during Monday and Monday night, and as temps fell below freezing around 7 p.m., edges of roads began to ice.

    The school delay was announced around 5:30 a.m. Henry, Spencer, Franklin and Anderson county schools are all closed.

    Snow had covered eastern Shelby County for much of the day, but in the late afternoon and evening, it spread west from Shelbyville.

  • News Briefs: Feb. 4, 2011

    Saddlebred association
    to appeal court ruling

    In a telephone meeting Tuesday, the board of directors of the American Saddlebred Horse Association voted unanimously to appeal a decision earlier this year by Fayette Circuit Court that would give open access to personal and confidential information of its members and staff.
    A group of members of the organization had taken the matter to court because they felt that ASHA had not been forthcoming with information.