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Local News

  • School year shortened by 2 days

    The Shelby County Board of Education voted Thursday to shorten the 2010-11 school calendar, with the last day for students now being June 3.
    The date is being moved up from June 7 because the district built in a much higher number of days and instructional hours than the state requirements.
    After the district missed several days this school year due to inclement weather, the board unanimously decided to reduce the school calendar which includes 175 6-hour days.

  • What happens in Shelby if U.S. shuts down?

    The looming potential of a federal government shutdown next Friday has people worried nationwide.

    Federal agencies could be charged with identifying essential programs and personnel, and several programs, offices and services could be shut down while Congress tries to agree on budget cuts for the upcoming fiscal year.

    And so far the programs that could be affected are being kept in the dark.

  • New zoning request won't merit new study

    The Triple S Planning Commission will cover an old topic at a new location when it meets on Tuesday at 6:30 p.m.

    Because of improvements being made at the Stratton Center, this month's Triple S meeting will be held in the Tulip Room at Shelbyville City Hall.

    There are just three items of new business, two concerning Equestrian Lakes North, the newest portion of the subdivision.

    The developers have reworked the preliminary plat of the subdivision that boarders Clark Station Road and KY 148.

  • Shelby County Animal Shelter: Too many dogs, not enough food, lots of help

    With an overcrowded population and short on funding, James Collins, an animal control officer with the Shelby County Animal Shelter, turned to the community for help.

    And in a matter of hours they responded.

    "We have had a huge response," Collins said about an E-mail he sent yesterday requesting help with dog food. The shelter currently has nearly 70 dogs, but is set up with just 30 kennel runs.

  • Montell, Hornback not optimistic about session

    Shelby County’s lawmakers say they can see what’s going on in the General Assembly, and they’re not hopeful that even the special session Gov. Steve Beshear called for Monday will find a solution to the messy Medicaid impasse they are facing.

    Beshear called this special session – the ninth since 2001 – to fix a $166 million gap in the Medicaid budget that, if not addressed, he said would cause at least 30 percent rate cuts to Medicaid providers in the next fiscal year, which starts July 1.

  • New signs of times on I-64

    There’s a bit of a civil war breaking out in eastern Shelby County, and the first shot wasn’t even heard.

    This is about Waddy and Peytona – or is it Peytona and Waddy? – neighbors along KY 395, which crosses Interstate 64 about 10 miles east of Shelbyville.

    You may not have noticed, but if you travel eastbound on I-64, new signs placed there by the state now list the exit for “Peytona/Waddy” rather than giving Waddy the top billing it has had since the exit opened in the late 1950s.

  • News Briefs: March 11, 2011

    Stratton Center’s remodeling forces
    Fiscal Court’s meeting to be moved

    The location of the meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court set for Tuesday has been changed because of remodeling at the Stratton Center.
    The meeting will be held at the Shelby County Emergency Management Agency Building, which is located at 98 7th St.
    The time of the meeting will remain 10 a.m.
    Galbraith-Riley get new campaign manger

  • Gov. Beshear calls special session on Medicaid issue

    Frankfort - Gov. Steve Beshear today issued a call for a special session to begin on Monday, March 14 to address a gap in the Medicaid budget that will cause at least 30 percent rate cuts to Medicaid providers, such as hospitals, nursing homes, doctors, pharmacists and mental health providers.

  • Schools to consider expanding summers

    After a successful summer school expansion that focused on literacy in first- and third-grade students last year, Shelby County Superintendent James Neihof will ask the Shelby County Board of Education to help fund an even bigger undertaking at Thursday's 7 p.m. meeting at Southside Elementary.

  • Green movement to start at its home

    The City of Shelbyville's Public Works Department is looking to turn its property into a showplace and teaching tool for a cleaner environment.

    Jennifer Herrell, the public works director and city engineer, received a $24,000 grant that will help fund the project to turn the location at 787 Kentucky Street into a sustainable and green campus for the city.

    When it's finished, the project will show several different ways to help deal with storm water runoff, as part of the Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System program (MS4) she heads for the city.