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Local News

  • Bus, car collide, sending drivers to hospital

    Both drivers were hospitalized Wednesday afternoon after a car struck a bus loaded with 47 children headed home from school on Mount Eden Road in Shelbyville.

    Both the bus driver, David Kendall of Shelbyville, and the driver of the car that hit the bus, Georgia Perry, 79, of Southville, were taken to Jewish Hospital Shelbyville with unknown injuries, though they were not thought to be life-threatening, Shelby County Deputy Sheriff Fred Rothenburger said.

  • Simpsonville closer to building sidewalks

    That federal transportation grant the city of Simpsonville won last year for its city sidewalk project along U.S. 60 appears to be moving into a faster lane toward construction.
    Commissioners approved at their meeting Wednesday morning a resolution for Mayor Steve Eden to sign the paperwork required to receive the $320,000 from the stimulus program.

  • Schools doing OK vs. board’s goals

    Shelby County Public Schools showed overall good performance against the goals the school board set for its 2010-11 school year, but there also are some areas in which aggressive goals weren’t met.

    That was the assessment the board heard at its meeting Thursday night during a review of the goals, which center on the district’s 5 Main Things of Curriculum Alignment, Instructional Norms, Professional Learning Communities, Intervention and Enrichment.

  • School board OKs new summer plan

    The Shelby County School Board voted unanimously at Thursday’s meeting to fund an expanded summer school program.

    The district will now add intensive 1-month literacy programs in fifth, seventh and ninth grades to the programs installed last year for first and third grades.

    The district is working to build a curriculum based on the Comprehensive Intervention Model (CIM), which administrators used for the younger grades in last year’s first revamped summer program.

  • EARLIER: Shelby County Public Schools to launch accelerated academies

    Members of the Shelby County Board of Education got a bit of a surprise Thursday night: an accidental preview of a new approach to educating the county’s highest achieving students.

    Kerry Fannin, the assistant superintendent for student achievement, was so excited during his presentation at the board’s meeting that he couldn’t sit on an announcement that had been scheduled for the meeting on March 24.

    "In two weeks I can't wait to present an accelerated academy for both high schools," he told the board.

  • Did your water bill fail to show up?

    Customers of Shelbyville Municipal Water and Sewer may want to double check that they have paid their bills for March.

    The company has reported getting a lot of calls from customers who never received those bills.

    Enough so, in fact, that Manager Tom Doyle has checked into the matter.

    "We're not really sure what happened yet," he said. "We're confident that the number of bills we printed and the weight of the bills before mailing them matched up with what we normally do. From there, we don't know what happened."

  • County looks to trim more than $400,000

    The feeling was cautiously optimistic Tuesday morning when Shelby County Fiscal Court approved a first reading an amended budget that took a more than $400,000 slice out of its operating budget.

    Despite that, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said he was not displeased, because though some substantial cuts were made, several took the county out of what he called its “comfort zone,” because it removed any cushion from the categories affected.

    The cuts magistrates approved include:

  • Shelby families feared worst in Japan's tragedy

    Days after a devastating earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan’s northern coastal cities, some Shelby County families remain numb with shock and weak with relief that their loved ones are safe.

    But some of them didn’t know that immediately and say the natural inclination to think the worst kicked in after they saw horrible images of death and destruction on television newscasts from Japan, where the death toll already numbers in the thousands and could climb as high as 10,000.

  • Precautions taken in Kentucky for potential quakes

    Shelby County Emergency Management Agency Director Charlie Frazee said that although Kentucky is situated near the New Madrid Seismic Zone, earthquakes that could occur in this area are not likely to be as catastrophic as the one that hit Japan.

    Nevertheless, he said he would  be taking part in an earthquake training seminar to held this spring.

  • EARLIER: Shelby County still pursuing Anderson County jail deal

    Shelby County Jailer Bobby Waits was scheduled to attend the Anderson County Fiscal Court meeting Tuesday night to discuss the idea of striking a deal to house prisoners from Anderson at the Shelby County Detention Center.

    Anderson Jailer Joani Clark and Waits had said last week that they were discussing such a move because Clark is dissatisfied with an arrangement she has with Franklin County Jailer Billy Roberts.