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Local News

  • News Briefs: Feb. 18, 2011

    Driver’s license services
    to be down on Monday

  • Triple S clears Aqua Shores complaints

    The Triple S Planning Commission wrapped up a brief meeting Tuesday by putting a cap on some complaints a resident of the Aqua Shores subdivision had raised during its meeting in January.

    Executive Director Ryan Libke presented commissioners with a list of permits issued, complaints and zoning violations for the neighborhood dating back to 2002.

  • Public to hear KY 53 plans on Tuesday

    Transportation officials are gearing up for a public meeting to hear input on the planned widening of KY 53 from Interstate 64 to U.S. 60.

    The meeting, which had to be postponed in January because of inclement weather will be held in two sessions starting at 5 p.m. at Highland Baptist Church, 511  Mount Eden Road, and representatives from the Kentucky Transportation Cabinet will be on hand to answer questions.

  • ‘In God We Trust’ plate now available

    That new license plate inscribed with “In God We Trust” is now available at the Shelby County Clerk’s office.
     

    “People don’t know we have it yet, and we want to let them know it’s available,” County Clerk Sue Carole Perry said.

    The plates went on sale Jan. 1 statewide after the General Assembly last year approved their addition as an alternative in the most recent design of plates.

  • U.S. 60 near Clay Village closed when pole falls

    U.S. 60 near Clay Village was closed for nearly three two hours Thursday afternoon when a power pole fell over in the road, officials said.

    The pole fell in the 7200 block of Frankfort Road, just east of Buzzard’s Roost Road, and power lines were dangling on the road.

    The highway was reopened at 4:12 p.m.

    The pole was not struck by a vehicle, and gusting winds could have been responsible, officials said.

  • Hanna's Day of Hope to donate $1 million to Kosair

    The Evans family of Simpsonville, who lost their daughter Hanna at age 6 and established the Hanna’s Day of Hope to raise money to help sick children, is donating $1 million to establish a transplant program at Kosair Children’s Hospital.

    The family annually hosts a golf tournament and holiday party to raise money to support the Cancer Care and Renal Center at Kosair plus other pediatric programs.

    On Monday, they will announce the establishment of the Hanna Catherine Evans Bone Marrow Transplant Program.

     

  • Simpsonville to pursue police grants

    The Simpsonville Police Department again will pursue available grants to help beef up its patrols.

    That’s what Police Commissioner Scott McDowell told the city commission during a speedy meeting Wednesday morning at city hall.

    McDowell said the city had won more than $24,000 in grants in past years and that he recently had become aware of the opportunities that are available.

    “There’s one you can get for DUI enforcement that will pay overtime for officers,” he said.

  • News Briefs: Feb. 16, 2011

    Bill introduced to limit
    terms for lawmakers

    A bill introduced in the Kentucky House of Representatives would impose term limits on state legislators. House Bill 375 would limit members of the House and Senate to serve no more than three consecutive terms in office. Rep. Mike Nemes, R-Louisville, sponsor of the measure, said he feels it is representative of the wishes of Kentucky residents.

  • Schools to add new positions

    Shelby County Public Schools is expecting to continue growing for the 2011-12 school year.

    Based on what district Director of Finance Greg Murphy bills as very conservative estimates for student growth and state funding, the school board on Thursday approved allocating 3.7 new teaching positions next year.

    This allocation process is the second step in the budget cycle for the school district, following state guidelines to have a budget in place by the beginning of the school year.

  • Schools want to remain partners with United Way

    Shelby County Public Schools is hoping to partner with Metro United Way to broaden the community involvement of the Master It! mentoring program.

    Master It! (Mentoring African-American Students To Effectively Reach Intentional Tomorrows!) is a program aimed at finding mentors for African-American students and helping them establish individual growth plans that will push them to more rigorous advanced classes and AP classes.