.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • City of Shelbyville plans to buy old Blue Gables Motel

    The city of Shelbyville could be looking to get into commercial property.

    The city is working with the Kentuckiana Regional Planning & Development Agency (KIPDA) on a Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) that would allow the city to purchase the old Blue Gables Motel on the corner of 8th and Main streets.

    Mark Stivers, who owns the property, did not return phone calls Tuesday, but Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said the city is looking at the possible acquisition as an opportunity.

  • Rubles ask city to annex property

    The City of Shelbyville could grow by more than 70 acres in next to no time.

    Fresh on the heels of voting to annex the property where Bluegrass Bowling Center currently sits, the Shelbyville City Council soon will be voting on another annexation, this time on the northwest side of Shelbyville.

    Tom and Allen Ruble have sent a letter to the city asking for annexation of about 70 acres zoned agricultural that sits just west of the Shelbyville Bypass and south of Harrington Mill Road.

  • Noted author to speak at library

    Gurney Norman will be the guest author 6-7 p.m. Thursday for a third in the series of “Spend an Evening with....” at the Shelby County Public Library.

    He is a charter member of the faculty of the Hindman Settlement School’s Writers Workshop and continues to serve as a senior writer in residence for that annual event.

  • Japan fundraiser leaves organizer ‘disappointed’

    The one-woman whirlwind to generate some money to aid earthquake-savaged Japan had her own world shaken a bit on Saturday.

    The bake sale Mallory Taylor organized at the Waldridge Center generated only light traffic and a few hundred dollars worth of donations.

    “I was a little disappointed,” she said. “I went home and cried.”

    Taylor had started a campaign to raise money to donate through the American Red Cross.

  • Soldiers finally honored in ‘hallowed ground’

    On a warm, crystal clear, almost muggy spring day – quite different from the day when they died – 22 long-forgotten African-American soldiers were laid to proper rest in a skillfully created memorial alongside U.S. 60 near Simpsonville.

    A crowd of perhaps 150 was on hand Sunday as project manager Jerry Miller and a group of dignitaries celebrated the final resting of the member of the 5th U.S. Colored Cavalry who died in ambush by Confederate guerillas as they drove cattle to Louisville in January 1865.

  • How high was the water in Shelby County on Tuesday?

    The nearly 24 hours of consistent rain that poured down onto Shelby County from Monday to Tuesday morning caused plenty of localized flooding and closed some roads – and also triggered an emergency overflow at the Guist Creek dam that hasn’t happened in years.

    National Weather Service Meteorologist Mark Jarvis said that from 7 a.m. Monday to 7 a.m. Tuesday, Shelbyville received 4.07 inches of rain, and some parts of the county near the Oldham/Shelby County line were at about 3.8 inches.

  • Event focuses on women’s wellness

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville will welcome women from all over the region Tuesday for its sixth annual Women’s Wellness Affair.

    The event, which will be from 5 p.m. to 8:30 at Claudia Sanders Dinner House, gives women the chance to get several tests done in one place and enjoy a ladies only evening.

    Dr. Carolyn Burns of Louisville Pathology is the keynote speaker, and she is scheduled to focus on the growing risk of anemia and how it can affect healthcare choices women.

  • EARLIER: The final rites of new memorial for Civil War skirmish

    A question that burst from the pages of a 19th century diary will arrive at a fully developed, star-spangled answer on Sunday afternoon.

    That’s when the memorial for the “Skirmish Near Simpsonville” will be dedicated and end a 4-year journey of discovery for a Shelby County native who,  with lot of help, made it all happen.

    The site along U.S. 60, just west of Simpsonville, stands as a permanent memorial to the 22 members of the 5th U.S. Colored Cavalry who died there on Jan. 25, 1865, in an ambush by Confederate guerillas.

  • County to purchase box to keep its asphalt hot

    Shelby County Road Supervisor Carl Henry seems to have lot to be excited about these days.

    Not only are long snowy nights spent on his cot at the road department over for a while (hopefully), but he also has a new salt barn under construction and, even better, he just received permission night to buy a new “hot box.”

    You might ask what a hot box is.

    Magistrates did at Tuesday night’s meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court.

  • News Briefs: April 8, 2011

    School board calls

    special meetings

    The Shelby County Board of Education has added two special called meetings for next week.

    The board will meet at the district’s central office in closed session on Tuesday to discuss legal matters and for the private portion of the review of Superintendent James Neihof.