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Local News

  • Collins captures 8th Region Title

    For the second time in consecutive nights, the Collins boys’ basketball season came down to late free throws.

    With five seconds remaining in regulation and down 53-52 to Anderson County, senior forward Dominique Turner stepped up to the foul line and knocked down both charity stripe shots to put Collins ahead by one point, but the game was not over yet.

  • Sidewalk project on path to construction

    Phase III of the Simpsonville Sidewalk Project is ready to enter the bidding stage, a step that city officials say should take place this month.

    "Hite [Hays] and I finally got all the easements; with the help of the mayor, we got the last one, so that has all been turned into the state of Kentucky," Simpsonville City Administrator David Eaton told the Simpsonville City Commission at its meeting Thursday night.

  • Former Simpsonville police officer gets 12 years for P.D. robbery

    Terry Putnam was sentenced Monday to 12 years in prison for a 2015 robbery at the Simpsonville Police Department.

    Putnam, the Simpsonville Police officer arrested Jan. 7, 2016, in connection with the November 2015 robbery of thousands of dollars as well as guns and drugs from the Simpsonville Police Department, had pleaded guilty before Shelby Circuit Judge Charles Hickman in January.

    Putnam made an open plea, which left the sentence up to the judge’s discretion.

  • Exchange of ideas

    An overall optimistic tone came out of a roundtable discussion Sunday with members of the local NAACP chapter and members of the University of Louisville’s College of Arts and Sciencesdiscussing topics of concern to Black Americans stemming from the 2016 election.

    Mitchell Payne, a member of the Shelby County NAACP and a retired UofL official served as moderator for event and said that while, “We all believe the struggle is not over and freedom is not free,” he was excited to see so many people interested in social issues.

  • Mystery boom

    Social media was bustling with chatter over the weekend regarding an unanticipated and thunderous boom that occurred Saturday evening. But days later, people are still searching for a solid explanation.

    Shelby County Emergency Management Agency Director Paul Whitman said he was asleep at the time but began receiving text messages around 9:15 Saturday night questioning a loud boom that radiated through the eastern portion of the county.

    Whitman said there were reports from those in Mount Eden to Bagdad.

  • Sams tenders school board resignation

    Shelby County Board of Education member Karen Sams announced last week her decision to step down from her position on the board.  Sams, who has served on the Shelby County Board of Education since 2012, tendered her resignation to the board through a prepared statement on February 24 citing a conflicting work schedule.

  • Former Simpsonville police officer gets 12 years for P.D. robbery

    Terry Putnam was sentenced Monday to 12 years in prison for a 2015 robbery at the Simpsonville Police Department

  • Shelby escapes carnage from storm


    Spring-like weather to return next week, say forecasters

    With severe storm sirens and warning tones sounding around the state Tuesday night and Wednesday morning, Shelby escaped with very little damage while several other areas of the state suffered everything from downed power lines and trees, flooding and property damage from roof being torn off barns and even houses in some cases.

  • Shelbyville program examines elections’ impact on black Americans

    A discussion in Shelbyville on Sunday will examine the effect of the recent elections – from the statehouse to the White House – on black Americans.

    The event, to be hosted at Clay Street Baptist Church, 1940 Midland Trail, is being organized by the Shelbyville NAACP in partnership with the University of Louisville’s College of Arts and Sciences.

    The free event is a public panel entitled, “The Impact of the 2016 Elections on Black America: What Happened and Why?”

  • Showcasing the arts

    Not only is spring in the air, but also the excitement of having an art gallery operating downtown again.

    The Dogwood Art Gallery, which opened in the Shoppes at Blue Gables last month, will celebrate its grand opening Saturday.

    The facility is the new home of the Shelby Regional Arts Council.

    Janice Emery, interim director of the council, was busy Wednesday getting ready for the event.