.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Health department tax stays flat

    Taxpayers won’t be shelling out more in taxes to maintain Shelby County’s facility this year, as the county has elected to maintain the same tax rate.

    At its meeting Tuesday night, the Shelby County Fiscal Court accepted the Shelby County Board of Health’s tax rate for the 2017-18 fiscal year of 3.75 cents per $100 of assessed property. That rate has not changed since 2004, when it increased from 2.8 cents.

  • Bill moves special elections to regular election cycle

    A bill that merges special elections with primary or general elections has been passed, and local election officials say it has been a long time coming.

    “The county clerks have tried to get that bill passed for years, and we never could get it passed,” said Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry of House Bill 319.

  • Shelby farmer earns top honors in corn growing

    Once again this year, a Shelby County farmer has paced the state in corn production.

    Kevin Smith of Shelby County was honored in March at the 2016 National Corn Yield Contest in St. Louis that recognizes farmers from across the country for exceptional efforts.

    Smith placed first in the state of Kentucky in the No-Till, Non-Irrigated Class with a yield of 253 bushels per acre.

  • Prom can be a pretty penny

    Between purchasing tickets, dinner, hair, makeup, nails, flowers, photography and a limousine rental, the cost of attending prom can get pricey even before the cost of a dress and the accessories are taken into account.

    According to Promgirl, you can expect to spend between a few hundred and up to a few thousand for the special night.

    In fact, a survey from Visa noted in 2015 that parents spend an average of $989 on their daughters and $893 on their sons to attend prom.

  • Collins student receives prestigious Purdue scholarship

    When it comes to college applications, Collins senior Chris Embry has hit the jackpot.

    “There’s no way to put into words, but it’s a feeling almost like winning the lottery,” Embry said of the overwhelming excitement he experienced when he opened an e-mail informing that he had been selected to receive the Beering Scholarship with Purdue University.

    As one of just eight recipients of the prestigious scholarship, Embry will have little concern for college debts or expenses for quite some time.

  • Shelbyville is 4th healthiest in Kentucky

    Shelby County once again finds itself as one of the healthiest counties in the state.

    For the second year in a row Shelby County has been ranked the 4th healthiest county in Kentucky in the annual County Health Rankings & Roadmaps, released by the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

    Shelby has remained near the top after making a substantial jump from 2012, when the county came in 9th place, following a rising trend, coming in 12th in 2011 and 22nd in 2010.

  • JHS has new technology for stroke victims

    Jewish Hospital Shelbyville is home to new technology that could mean a new lease on life for stroke victims.

    Thanks to a $1.8 million investment from Catholic Health Initiatives (CHI), patients, families and providers in Shelbyville now have the benefit of a high-tech, remote connection to the region’s leading neurologists, resulting in quicker treatment for patients experiencing stroke, said officials at Jewish Hospital Shelbyville.

  • New owner reopens donut shop

    After a brief closure at Donut Express on Midland Trail, new owners Morice Smith and his girlfriend, Shannon Chavez, want the community to know the shop is back open and the donuts are already rolling out of the oven.

  • Charter schools pass, leave questions

    The lengthy debate regarding a charter school bill in Kentucky has been put to bed.  Gov. Matt Bevin signed the bill into law last week and no appeal came as the session wrapped.

    Many urge that charter schools give parents additional educational opportunities for their students to be better served, while others argue the new law will take money from underfunded traditional public schools.

    Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof said it’s too early to say what the new law will mean for Shelby County, or even the state.

  • Post office warns of recent mail theft

    An ongoing problem with mail theft is resurfacing again in Shelby.

    "We’ve had six reports just this week of packages being stolen," said Angela Bowens, service supervisor with the Shelbyville Post Office. "In one instance, the lady was at home on the phone and she knew the carrier had delivered it. She finished her phone conversation and she went to the door and a car was backing out of her driveway – they had stolen her package."

    Bowen said it's not just packages that being targeted, but also letters.