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Local News

  • Prison mission aims at reducing criminal relapse

    This year, the growing non-profit organization, Mission Behind Bars and Beyond (MB3), has kicked up its efforts to address Kentucky’s recidivism rates.

    Joey Pusateri, pastor of Simpsonville Christian Church, and a member of the board of directors for MB3 said criminal relapse is a serious issue they continuously battle.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board to hold work session with budget committee

    The Shelby County Board of Education will meet Thursday for its regularly scheduled meeting at 7 p.m. at Clear Creek Elementary School, 279 Chapel Hill Road and will discuss spending for the upcoming budgeting period. During the meeting, the board will hold a work session with the budget committee and Public Relations Coordinator Ryan Allan said the committee will share its recommendation for next year’s budget with the board.

    Those recommendations, based on the board’s decision, will be reflected in the tentative budget presented to the board in May.

  • Heritage’s Lyles named Teacher of the Year

    Shelby County Public Schools announced Heritage Elementary School’s Julia Lyles as the 2016-17 Teacher of the Year.

    Surrounded by friends, colleagues and family members, the third grade teacher was recognized Thursday evening at a ceremony honoring each school’s selected teacher of the year, following a brief video in their honor.

    Lyles said she was honored to receive the recognition.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL: Non-partisan election pass first reading

    Though Shelbyville City Council members had a long discussion last month in considering whether to switch to a nonpartisan election, when it finally come down to a decision Thursday night there was no dissention on the matter, which was on the table for a first reading.

    Councilmember Donna Eaton, who had first suggested the idea last month, made the motion to approve, and Frank Page seconded the motion. No vote necessary, only a motion and a second to get a second reading.

  • A healthier community

    In keeping with a move in which Kentucky’s local boards of health are adopting a legislative platform targeting at updating the state’s public health system with the goal of improving overall health throughout the state, Shelby County is ready to meet that challenge, officials say.

    In fact, said David Cammack, new interim director of the Shelby County Health Department, appointed last year upon the retirement of Renee Blair, the board has already taken what he feels are great strides, considering a big change in staffing.

  • Hold the phone

     

    Shelby County’s Jillian Jacobs, along with four classmates at Capital Day School in Frankfort, are in the running for national recognition for a phone app designed to help feed the hungry.

    The team was recently selected as Best in State and Best in Region winners in the fifth annual Verizon Innovative Learning app challenge for a mobile app concept “Waste Free America.” For the honor, the team received a $5,000 award from the Verizon Foundation for their school and tablets for each team member.

  • Kindergarten start dates pushed

    Some parents gearing up to send their little one to kindergarten in the upcoming school year might have to hold off on their school supply shopping for another year.

    Starting this coming school year, children must be five years old on or before Aug. 1 to enter kindergarten.  Previously, the cutoff was October 1.

    In 2012, however, the General Assembly changed the law with the mindset that younger students may not be ready for kindergarten.

    That law is set to go into effect for the 2017-18 school year.

  • Night to Shine

    Although prom season as we traditionally know it is still a few months away, thousands of young men and women dressed in their formal best will make their way to one of 375 churches around the globe for their very own Night to Shine, an unforgettable prom night experience for people with special needs, ages 14 and older.

    Sponsored by the Tim Tebow Foundation, the worldwide movement will take place in all 50 states and 11 countries around the world at 6 p.m. on Feb. 17, and one of those locations includes Spencer Christian Church in Spencer County.

  • Investigation in human remains enters new stage

    After an intensive search for more human remains in Waddy yielded more skeletal bones last week, investigators are now concentrating on a more daunting task –identification.

    “Any technology that’s out there that can help identify, as to male, female, age – we are trying to determine if we’re going to have an avenue where we can identify this individual,” said Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong.

  • Mini horse recovering after vicious attack

    Though moving painfully Princess, the miniature horse recently stabbed after being attacked by a dog, is slowly recuperating.

    William “Snake” Bruns said that he is keeping a close eye on the miniature horse he rescued 16 years ago, after she was first attacked Jan. 19 at his residence on Jail Hill Road by a pit bull and then again Jan. 23 by a person.