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Local News

  • 4th sparks an interest in fireworks

    With tents popping up throughout the city, a newcomer might think the circus is in town, but locals know what those tents bring and it’s not clowns and acrobats…it’s better.

    Under those big tops you’ll find gunpowder, chemicals, fuel and other scientific and testosterone-fueled ingredients needed to create the ideal pyrotechnic display – perfect for celebrating your independence with friends and family.

    In other words, fireworks have arrived in Shelby County.

  • 400 new jobs could land in Shelby

    More than 400 jobs could be opening soon for Shelby County residents as one of the largest international automotive parts manufacturers in the world is contemplating opening a new facility in Simpsonville.

    And that Thursday decision was made a little more enticing when Kentucky Economic Development Finance Authority gave preliminary approval for $3 million in tax incentives tied to employment and an $18 million investment.

  • Adult day care services in jeopardy in Shelby

    Shelby County’s Adult Day Care Center will be soon be forced to cut its services in half due to a reduction in funding, officials say.

    The center, located at the Shelby County Senior Citizens Center on 207 Washington Street and operated by Mulitpurpose Community Action Agency, will remain open from 8 a.m. to 4 p.m. five days per week, but that could change as soon as next month, said Pat Sullivan, director of the adult day program.

  • 4 arrested in bizarre crime spree

    A bizarre crime spree earlier this month involving a joy ride in a stolen car and breaking into a school and a church, has law enforcement and victims alike shaking their heads in bafflement.

    “It’s kinda nuts,” said Dennis Dove, executive minister at Shelby Christian Church, one of three facilities hit in a frenzy of burglary and vandalism by four Shelby County teens during the first week of June.

  • Family trying to rebuild goat herd

    A Shelby County family that lost most of their goat herd in a horrific fire in May is getting a helping hand from the community.

    The Mejias have received donations of goats and even got one doe this past week.

    “There’s a couple in Owingsville that had E-mailed me the very first day this [fire] happened, and wanted to donate a goat to me,” Kathy Mejia said.

  • NEWS DIGEST: June 25, 2014

    Rabb house/office to

    receive historical marker

    A historical marker will be placed at the former home and office of Dr. Maurice Rabb, Sr., 413 Henry Clay Street, Shelbyville.

    The presentation, which will be Tuesday at 1:30 p.m., will honor Rabb, his wife, Jewel, and son Dr. Maurice Rabb, Jr.

  • Board will look at altering voting districts

    The Shelby County Board of Education will hear recommendations on redistricting for the board’s

    geographic boundaries at their regular meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday in the district's offices, 1155 Main Street in Shelbyville.

    The proposed changes are a result of rezoning done by the county to balance the population after the 2010 Census, according to Ryan Allan, the public relations coordinator for the district. In regards to population changes, the county clerks office made some changes to voting boundaries.

  • Family returns to explore their Shelbyville heritage

    From stores to residential areas, as you travel throughout Shelby County it does not take long to find the name Middelton plastered across various landmarks. But who are the Middelton’s?

    This past Saturday, families traveled from Florida, Texas, Georgia, Missouri and North Carolina for a reunion in Shelby County with that same question on their minds.

    Armed with stacks of research papers, photos, cameras and laptop files galore, the family went on what they dubbed the Caudill/Middelton heritage tour, soon discovering answers to those family questions.

  • A Kentucky Proud yard

    The temperatures may be rising into the nineties this week but Joan Brown, known to many locals as the Road Kill Chef, isn’t slowing down in her garden.

    “Sometimes I have to tell myself, Joan slow down you can’t work like you used to,” she said with a smile.

    But those years of hard work are being recognized.

  • City council to discuss non-domestic animal ordinance

    The Shelbyville City Council isn’t quite ready to present their garbage Requests for Proposals [RFPs] to the public yet.

    However, Mayor Tom Hardesty said those proposals would be on the agenda next month. The council’s next regularly scheduled meeting is July 3.

    But for the council’s special called meeting this week, at 6:30 p.m. Thursday at city hall, 315 Washington Street, the council will discuss the non-domestic animals ordinance.