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Local News

  • Town hall talk on pensions

     Across the state, those who dedicate their lives to serving our communities are facing the challenge of an uncertain future with their retirement plans.

    The PFM Consulting Group, which was hired by the state, offered recommendations last month for Kentucky's pension systems that could save the state more than $1 billion a year.

    However, those recommendations have left many concerned, including members of the Shelby County Education Association.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board approves 4 percent tax hike

     In a 3-2 split decision, the Shelby County school board members elected ultimately to adopt an increased property tax rate of .731 up from the current .715 per $100 of assessed value.

    The meeting opened with a public hearing on the matter and while no members of the community were present to speak for or against the proposed change, board members did not come to their decision lightly.

  • A wild goose chase

    Several Shelby residents found their lake plans thwarted Monday by road closure signs, as open hunting season of waterfowl in Kentucky expanded into the Lake Shelby area in response to the overcrowding population of geese in the region.

    Shelbyville/Shelby County Parks Director Shawn Pickens said an inspection from the U.S. Department of Agriculture determined the geese to be a human safety risk.

  • Painting by numbers

    If you noticed some roads throughout Shelby bearing freshly striped paint just before receiving a fresh coat of asphalt, your eyes were not deceiving you.

    Some roads that were being repaved were striped by mistake, officials said.

    Kentucky State Transportation Cabinet Public Information Officer Andrea Clifford said the striping contractor for Shelby’s state road projects is Reynolds Sealing and Striping Inc.

    However, officials from that company said they were not responsible.

  • Reading between the lines

    If you like nothing better than relaxing with a good book, then the upcoming Bookfest is right down your alley.

    Deloris Odenweller, an organizer of the yearly event, glanced around Wednesday at mounds of books lining the walls at The Sentinel-News, where for weeks people have been dropping off books to donate to the event, which will be Oct. 12-14.

  • Wild and wooly weekend

    Shelby County residents can get out and take a close-up view of their agricultural neighbors, as the fifth annual Good Neighbors Farm Tour returns Saturday.

    The event will encompass 9 farms, with agricultural activity from racehorses and livestock to wine making and honeybee and wool production, with plenty of opportunity to buy homemade products.

    You’ll even be able to taste fresh farm products ranging from the sweet ice cream and honey to fresh vegetables and fruit wine to savory pork, lamb and beef.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION - Proposed gas station in Waddy pushes to 2 meetings

    With several hot topics on the agenda, the Triple S Planning Commission has elected to schedule two meetings back-to-back this month, rather than risk overcrowding the room.

  • Jewish is out of local hospitals

     On Sept. 1, Catholic Health Initiatives became the "sole sponsor" or owner of KentuckyOne Health, when the parent company bought out The Jewish Heritage Fund for Excellence’s interests in a $150 million deal.

  • Four paws for Paxton

    Parents know that going anywhere with little ones can be a challenge.

    But for Southside Elementary art teacher Michelle Thomas and her husband Delonte, going out with their children can be an extremely overwhelming task. That’s because not only do they have three little ones, but their 5-year-old son, Paxton, has autism.

    Activities most of us take for granted like a dinner out, a trip to the grocery, our kid’s soccer game, aren’t a quick trip for the Thomas family.

  • The legacy of a witness

    Next week Main Street will close and people will gather around to lay witness to a dramatic scene, much like they did 80 years ago.

    On Sept. 20, 1937, a gunshot resonated through the streets of downtown Shelbyville when the brothers of Oldham County murder victim Verna Garr Taylor shot and killed her alleged murderer, Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt.

    But when the scene plays out this time, it will be a bit more theatrical, as the community gathers to reenact the event in honor of the eightieth anniversary.