.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Dishing on issues

    Local politicians State Sen. Paul Hornback (R-Shelbyville) and Rob Rothenburger (R-Shelbyville) took time out from their busy schedules on Friday to hold an informal legislative update discussion at the Stratton Center.

    The pair told the small crowd of about 25, which included heads of government for Shelby County, Shelbyville and Simpsonville, about some new legislation that has been on the forefront during this year’s General Assembly, which convened the first week in January.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – SCHS team receives national recognition

    When the Shelby County Board of Education convenes for its regularly scheduled meeting Thursday at 7 p.m. at the district’s central office, 1155 West Main Street, will the Shelby County High School Construction Team will be recognized for a national accomplishment.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL – Council further considers non-partisan elections

    No official changes are in the books just yet, but on Thursday the Shelbyville City Council gave City Attorney Steve Gregory the go-ahead to establish for their consideration an ordinance that would change the city council elections to a non-partisan race.

  • Dishing out dining dollars

    With the first year of the Shelbyville Restaurant Tax in the books, many residents have asked council members where the money is going.

    Shelbyville City Administrator Fred Rogers said in the first year, the city has received about $350,000 from the tax, which was split 50/50 with tourism– meaning the tax generated around $700,000 in Shelbyville in the first year.

    Some funds have already been put to good use, Shelbyville City Council member Bobby Andriot said, but they are being cautious about moving forward too quick.

  • Dishing out dining dollars

    With the first year of the Shelbyville Restaurant Tax in the books, many residents have asked council members where the money is going.

    Shelbyville City Administrator Fred Rogers said in the first year, the city has received about $350,000 from the tax, which was split 50/50 with tourism– meaning the tax generated around $700,000 in Shelbyville in the first year.

    Some funds have already been put to good use, Shelbyville City Council member Bobby Andriot said, but they are being cautious about moving forward too quick.

  • Vacant house burns on Bradshaw

     

  • Bald eagle sightings increasing in Shelby

    The bald eagle with its snowy-feathered head and tail – the proud symbol of the United States – is a sight most people don’t expect to see in Shelbyville.

    Lately, however, the elusive bird has been putting in appearances around the county.

    “Somebody called me the last day or two about seeing one out in the cornfield out where Vigo Road meets Cropper Road,” said Horace Brown, a local bird expert. “People are seeing them all the time, out at the golf course, at Guist Creek, at Lake Shelby and different places.”

  • Hemp permits in full bloom

    With the number of acres allotted to grow industrial hemp nearly tripling in 2017, this could be the year the crop challenges Kentucky’s reputation as the Bluegrass State.

    The Kentucky Department of Agriculture has approved 209 applications from growers who have been approved to cultivate up to 12,800 acres of industrial hemp for research purposes in 2017, nearly three times the number of acres that were approved for the previous year. More than 525,000 square feet of greenhouse space were approved for indoor growers in 2017.

  • Flu labeled as widespread in Kentucky

    With the Centers for Disease Control reporting an elevated level of flu activity throughout the United States and noting the virus as widespread in Kentucky, those in the medical profession are reminding people that it’s not to late to be vaccinated.

    “It only takes a week or so to really build up that immune response, getting a flu shot now will help people get through the rest of the season,” said Jason Underwood, owner of Shelbyville Pharmacy.

  • Building permits continue to increase

     

    After a long economic downturn that started more than a decade ago, it seems the housing market in Shelby County is regaining momentum.

    Triple S executive director Ryan Libke presented to the planning and zoning commission during its regularly scheduled meeting Tuesday a year-end recap that confirmed the housing market has gained some steam over the past five years.

    Libke said, concerning the number of dwelling units permitted, the county had its greatest year in 2004 with 659 but that number rapidly declined to 84 by 2011.