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Local News

  • Recalling D-Day on the 72th anniversary

    “The ships were so thick, you could hardly see the water – overhead, the planes, you could hardly see the sky for them. I had turned twenty-two right before that, and when I looked at that beach, where I was in that water, it went through my mind, ‘I'll never see my twenty-third birthday.’”

    World War II veteran John W. Miles paused in his recollection of his involvement in D-Day, the memory of that day clearly playing before his mind’s eye as he sat in his recliner at his assisted living apartment at Crescent Place in Shelbyville.

  • Shelby teacher selected to Education Professional Standards Board

    Shelby County High School Project Lead the Way Biomedical Science teacher Ashley Fishback has been selected to join six new appointees on the Education Professional Standards Board.

    Last week, Gov. Matt Bevin announced seven new members to the 17-person board that consists of fourteen gubernatorial appointees and Fishback said she was grateful to be included.

    “I am very honored to have been chosen for the position, and I look forward to serving the Commonwealth in this capacity,” she said.

  • Transitional housing plan moves forward

    After a lengthy discussion, the Shelbyville City Council eventually elected to move forward with a request to seek a recommendation from the Triple S Planning Commission for a conditional use permit on property in the Limited Historic District that would allow for transitional housing for women struggling with drug addiction.

  • Fair to offer a full motorsports schedule

    The Shelby County Fair is more than funnel cakes and carnival rides.  For many, it’s an opportunity to experience the sound of roaring engines, the sight of flying mud and the smell of exhaust fumes and all the thrills that come with American motorsports.

    So to kick up the excitement on the track, organizer Jimmy Hance said they wanted to offer an event every night of the fair this year.

  • New water tower taking shape

    Those driving in downtown Shelbyville near Prospect Street might see a new structure peeking out over the tree line. 

    “[It] should all be complete by about December,” said Shelbyville Municipal Water and Sewer Manager Tom Doyleof the developing water tower that is to replace the infrastructure on 5th Street.  “So far they have about one-hundred-and-twenty feet of the concrete structure built.”

  • Day-cations

    June has arrived and school is out. It’s officially time to start planning those summer family vacations. 

    But not every vacation requires a strict budget and a week off work.  The Bluegrass State is filled with numerous tourist hotspots and Shelby County’s prime location finds us a short drive from many of the most desirable spots.

  • Avoiding the summer brain drain

     

    The last bell has rung and school has officially closed for summer, but that doesn’t mean our kids’ brains should take a vacation, too. 

    In fact, as our children’s days are now filled with bike rides and pool parties, experts note that it’s important to keep their minds just as active as their bodies.

  • Fighting to breathe

    Every day is a breath of fresh air for many, but for Bobby Webb each day is a struggle for every breath.

    Webb has Cystic Fibrosis, a genetic and life-threatening disease that changes how his body makes mucus and sweat, and he’s battled the disease his entire life. He’s endured pneumonia, a blood infection and a kidney transplant. In 2011 he went through a double lung transplant but unfortunately, lung transplants are not a cure for CF and this past December doctors gave him just six months to a year to live.

  • Going out in style

    For 34 years Susan’s Hair Design has been a fixture in the community.  The Main Street business has not only served as a beauty shop, but also as a local hub of entertainment and conversation.  And it’s that aspect of the business that Susan Wells’ customers say they will miss the most.

  • Operation Care gets a rain garden

    Equipped with shovels, mulch, plants and dirt, Walt Reichert, horticulture technician at the Shelby County Cooperative Extension Office, and a team of devoted Master Gardeners went into battle this week against a drainage issue and chances are they will come out on top.

    Janevera Rothenburer, housing director of Operation Care’s Women’s Shelter, said the rainwater rushing down the steep slope coming from Washington Street to their backyard made her uneasy.