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Local News

  • BACK TO SCHOOL SHOPPING – From tacky to techy

    Teachers made out their lists and parents have checked them twice as they gear up for the second busiest shopping season of the year: back to school.

    Store shelves have been filled with classroom necessities like composition notebooks and No. 2 pencils but what really gets kids excited about back to school shopping are those trendy new items adorned with designs that just scream their names.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD Governor’s Scholars to be recognized

    The Shelby County Board of Education will recognize students that earned Governor’s Scholar distinction with a dinner and reception prior to the board meeting on Thursday.  The board will honor the scholars during the meeting at 7 p.m., as well.  Both the ceremony and dinner will be held at the Blair Center, 728 Ginkgo Drive.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL Tax rate to be considered

    The Shelbyville City Council will hear the first reading on the 2016 ad valorem tax rate Thursday when it convenes at 6:30 p.m. at City Hall, 315 Washington Street.  Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty said Tuesday afternoon he was not certain what the recommendation would be yet.

    “We are still trying to get a few figures from the PVA office,” he said. “We don’t have an idea of what to recommend yet.”

  • Single-engine plane crashes Sunday in Waddy

    A single-engine airplane crashed at takeoff in Waddy Sunday afternoon after suffering from engine trouble.

    The pilot, who officials say was conscious at the scene, was taken to the University of Kentucky hospital, and according to Shelby County dispatch suffered minor injuries. Officials have not released the pilot’s name or the plane’s number.

    The incident happened at Miles Field, a private airstrip in Waddy located in the 600 block of Grubbs Lane.

    The FAA will be on the scene in Shelby County on Monday to investigate the crash.

  • Horse Show a hit with crowd

    With a forecast of potential – but scattered – thunderstorms, officials at the Shelbyville Horse Show held their breath, fearing a repeat of the storm that nearly wrecked last year’s opening night.

    But it was a horse of a different color Wednesday, as the weather cooperated in a big way, said show officials.

    “Everything fell into place, the weather turned out to be very nice,” said show manager R.H. Bennett.

  • Cycle of progress

    Shelby County could become more bicycle and pedestrian friendly in the future if government entities around the county join forces to fund a countywide plan.

    At Tuesday night’s meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court, magistrates voted to contribute $6,500 to fund a $25,000 bike and pedestrian study to make such pathways mandatory for future state roadway widening projects.

    But the project may not get off the ground.

  • A helping hand in disasters

    Although very recently graduated from college, Michael Ducharm has thrown himself in the midst of a whirlwind training session to prepare him for just about anything.

    “I’m still in training, and I’m really excited about the possibilities on what kind of work I’ll be getting into,” he said.

    The Pleasureville resident who moved to Kentucky from California at the age of 12 is two weeks into a training program for AmeriCorps.

  • LG&E looks to build solar field in Shelby

    Louisville Gas and Electric Company and Kentucky Utilities Company requested permission earlier this week from the Kentucky Public Service Commission to develop a solar facility in Shelby County that would allow customers to share solar energy.

  • From the pool to the school

    The lazy days of summer are drawing to a close as we gear up for back to school season, which begins Wednesday.  Teachers are eagerly decorating classrooms while kids are picking out new backpacks in anticipation of a new year. 

    And while we might physically be ready for the 2016-17 school year with every item checked off the school supply list and a shiny new wardrobe in the closet, don’t underestimate the value of mental preparation, either.

  • Shelby-wood

    The camera reel started rolling last summer in Shelby County as a film crew began its journey to develop a TV series set in various locations throughout the community.

    Director Rick Carr and his team of about 10 worked tirelessly for months on a show Carr has named Reaper of the Soul, a dark series about a man who must battle the Grim Reaper for his soul.  Carr has since been preparing to pitch it to Hollywood.