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Local News

  • New professional group hopes to promote political activity

    Two Shelby County men have established a professional organization with an eye on encouraging young people to run for public office.

    Kendall Law and Austin Redmon co-founded the Shelby County Young Professionals Association in September. The group meets monthly, and just hosted its most recent meeting yesterday [Thursday].

  • Whirlwind of compassion

    Jeff Reynolds is one of the busiest people in town, but he’s never too busy to help someone in need.

    His wife, Robin, said she is very happy that people appreciate his compassionate nature, and she applauded harder than anyone Wednesday when Reynolds was named Shelbyville’s Citizen of the Year.

    “This is a real honor because God has put many people in high positions in our community and we have a very loving community that comes together and wants to make a difference,” he said in his acceptance speech.

  • Tiptoeing toward the Bourbon Trail

    Three years after announcing their intent to develop a local distillery, Diageo’s Bulleit Bourbon is ready to put Shelby County on the Bourbon Trail map.

    “We are exploring the possibility of opening a visitor’s center at the Bulleit Distilling Co. and are working with the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet on potential incentive opportunities,” a spokesperson for Diageo stated.  “This is part of that process.”

  • Thanks-giving back

      For most of us, Thanksgiving means over indulging, it means a plethora of leftovers spilling out of our refrigerators, it means napping on the couch and resting up for a day of overspending on Black Friday.

    But volunteers hope the community considers the day to also means sharing our blessings with those facing hardships.

    Brenda Jackson, who each year helps host a community Thanksgiving Day meal, said her community meal is still in need of more volunteers.

  • Resurrecting the Red Lion

    After long anticipation, the restaurant at Science Hill has returned and another dining option is ready to follow.

    The Red Lion is making its resurgence after at least four decades in the dark, Wakefield-Scearce Galleries CFO Matt Burnett said.

    “It was open in the sixties and seventies,” Burnett said, noting they are ready to resurrect the small pub.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION Burger King’s back

    Development is abuzz around Brunerstown Road and it seems another restaurant is in the works.

    Following the lead of Taco Bell and Bojangles, Burger King is ready to present ITS development plans for a 2,704-square-foot fast food restaurant for Mortown Way, adjacent to the recently developed Taco Bell.  Developers will present to the Triple S Planning Commission at Tuesday’s meeting at 6:30 p.m. at the Stratton Center, 215 Washington Street in Shelbyville.

  • I-64 shut down after fatal accident at Graefenburg exit

    Interstate 64 is shut down at Exit 48 in Graefenburg, due to a fatal accident.

    Franklin County Sheriff Pat Melton said that at 12:15 p.m. a tractor-trailer that was traveling westbound crossed the median and struck an SUV head-on, killing one person in the SUV. The driver of the tractor-trailer has been taken to the hospital with unknown injuries.

    Melton said the eastbound lane of I-64 is closed and a detour has been set up at Exit 48. He has no estimate yet of how long the roadway will be closed.

  • Author said new book was prompted by near death experience

    When Roger Snell lay near death in the hospital this past spring, his brush with the Grim Reaper chilled and changed him.

    When he recovered and left the hospital, he vowed to write a book about his glimpse into the afterlife, he said.

  • Farmer loses livestock feed in mysterious silo collapse

    Ben Nutter shook his head as he gazed at the ruins of a large silo that mysteriously toppled over at his dairy farm Sunday night.

    “I never heard of one falling before,” he said, pointing to the 60-foot structure lying crumpled on the ground. “There’s six hundred tons of silage in it – that’s three-hundred acres of corn,” he said.

    Nutter’s wife, Shannon, said the collapse of the silo on their dairy/beef operation on Drane Lane near Eminence is a catastrophic event for them.

  • Shelby farm family honored

    Shane and Mary Courtney are the 2017 recipients of the Kentucky Agribusiness of the Year Award.