.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local News

  • Local NAACP to host state conference

    The Shelbyville area branch of the NAACP will host the Kentucky State Conference of the organization's 70th annual event, a three-day event that runs through Sunday.

    The event begins at Ramada Inn today and moves to Clay Street Baptist Church on Saturday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. for general sessions. NAACP branches from across the state will be in attendance, with Raoul Cunningham, Kentucky State Conference President, presiding over the meeting along with the state executive committee members.

  • County gives EMS personnel raises

    At Tuesday's meeting of the Shelby County Fiscal Court, magistrates agreed to a substantial pay raise for some emergency services personnel.

    Magistrates lent unanimous approval, with Eddie Kingsolver making the motion to approve and Bill Hedges seconding, to raise starting pay for EMTs and paramedics by 16 and 19 percent, respectively.

    Starting pay for EMTS has been raised from $28,022 to $32,677 and from $33,012 to $39,381 for paramedics.

  • Dorman Center needs volunteers

    The Dorman Preschool Center, long renown for working with children with developmental delays, is badly in need of volunteers.

    "We have a huge need for volunteers at this time to help keep the doors open at the Dorman Center," said Ray Leathers, chair of the center's board. "The strong economic conditions in Shelby County have made it extremely difficult to recruit and retain teachers and teacher aids."

    Ron Caughron, president of the Dorman Center, said the facility faces a serious situation with an ever-decreasing staff.

  • Unsung hero to be portrayed by son

    Claude Hammond had heard the tale many times from his father about his role in apprehending the shooters in a classic murder case in Shelby County that made national news back in the 1930s.

    When he heard that Main Street was going to close down Saturday for a re-enactment about the sensational murder and trial that took place 80 years ago, he had to make sure that his father, Claude Hammond Sr., a Shelbyville policeman, would be not left out, the way that he has been since the incident happened, he said.

  • Annual Wild Game Feast Saturday

    It all started with a couple of local hunters and a full freezer and more than 15 years later, those same hunters will again host the annual Wild Game Feast to support youth and children’s ministries at Centenary United Methodist Church.

    Holly Husband, one of the organizers of the event, said tickets for the dinner, hosted at Floral Hall, are on sale now and can be purchased in advance by calling the Centenary church office at 633-4510.

  • Biagi’s says goodbye

    For nearly a century, business at Biagi’s Appliance has been good. But as they say, all good things must come to an end.

    So as brothers Steve and Robert Biagi wrap up the store’s 90th anniversary, they are preparing to close the doors on the family business.

    Annibale Biagi established Biagi’s Appliances in downtown Shelbyville in 1927.  The business passed through the hands of their grandfather to their father, Vincent, and uncle, Hugh, before the brother’s joined them at the helm in 1993.

  • Triple S Planning Commission - Waddy gas station approved

    With what they expected to be a lengthy agenda on the table, the Triple S Planning Commission divided its regularly scheduled monthly meeting into two nights.

    Tuesday’s meeting was regular business, but Wednesday drew some back and forth debate from the audience concerning a Preliminary Planned Unit Development for a Speedway fuel station in Waddy.

  • Paving the way for safety

     

  • Fun on the farm

    The leaves on some trees were just beginning to turn subtle shades of crimson and yellow on Saturday, creating a perfect backdrop for a crisp fall day of lazy family fun for the entire community.

    The Good Neighbors Farm Tour was in its 5th year this past weekend and those who participated in the self-guided tour of nine local farms said they couldn’t remember a more enjoyable tour. 

  • Reprising a family role in history

    Almost like a family tradition, Mike Tracy will do his part to clean up downtown Shelbyville this weekend.

    The owner of Tracy’s Home Furnishings will don police attire to patrol downtown for the re-enactment of the shooting of Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt, which took place 80 years ago and thrust Shelbyville into the national spotlight.