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Local News

  • Food bank and men's shelter to merge

    Two of Shelby's longtime charitable organizations, the Serenity Center and the Open Door of Hope men's shelter, are in the processing of merging into a single organization, a move that will not only better suit those in need, but also provide even more services in the future, said its leaders.

    "There's been collaboration between the Open Door of Hope and the Serenity Center,” said Steve Meadors, chairman of the board of Awake Ministries, the name of the new organization.

  • Farm bureau collects food for Backpack Program

    The Shelby County Farm Bureau Women’s Committee has collected more than 2,200 servings of food at the midpoint of the annual collection for the Shelby County Backpack Program.

    The women’s group Wednesday transported a huge amount of food to the Serenity Center for the program, which furnishes food for underprivileged elementary school children to eat on the weekends when they are not able to have access to meals at school.

  • Community Action Agency seeks funding

    Kim Embry-Hill is worried.

    As executive director of Shelby County’s Multi-Purpose Community Action Agency, she is concerned that not having enough money coming in could force the facility to either cut services or merge with another agency.

    Neither of those two scenarios is an attractive possibility, she told the Shelby County Fiscal Court, one of the entities she has reached out to lately to promote awareness of the problem. She also recently visited the Shelbyville City Council,

  • Letting his hair down

    Zach McIntosh started growing his hair long on a whim, but when it hit his shoulders and he knew it was past time for a haircut, he got an idea.

    McIntosh went to his mother with an idea that made her realize that not only was her son – a senior at Collins High School – becoming a man, but he was becoming a man with a kind and caring heart.

    "He decided he would like to help kids with cancer and donate his hair, and we couldn't be prouder of him," said Valery McIntosh, smiling at her husband, Nick, who nodded in agreement.

  • County working to prioritize road projects

    County officials say they are working with the state to prioritize the county’s road projects and that the long-standing Mount Eden Road widening project will take priority.

    And while state officials agree that the work is needed, there is still no timeframe for the construction.

    Shelby County Judge-Executive Dan Ison said he, Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty and Simpsonville Mayor Steve Eden met with Kentucky Transportation Cabinet officials on the matter two weeks ago.

  • Clerk, Sheriff excess fees grow

    The Shelby County Clerk and the Shelby County Sheriff’s offices both Tuesday turned in excess fees to the Shelby County Fiscal Court for 2016 in amounts larger than they submitted for the previous year.

    Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry turned $244,446 in for 2016, compared to $227,137 for 2015. Shelby County Sheriff Mike Armstrong saw an even bigger increase, turning in $319,607, compared to $260,081 for 2015.

  • Senate passes campus tobacco ban

    The senate last week passed legislation that would outlaw the use of all tobacco products, by students and visiting adults, on school properties and on school sponsored trips.

    Currently 62 of the state’s 173 districts already have tobacco free policies. While Shelby County is not a completely tobacco-free district, there are policies in place that prohibit the use of tobacco products in any building owned or operated by the board.

  • Statewide tornado drill is Tuesday

    The calendar might say February, but the forecast feels more like April showers and May flowers.

    With weather teetering in the 70s this week, anyone holding onto the dream of snow should put those weather wishes on hold and start making plans for the next season – which includes inclement weather.

  • TRIPLE S PLANNING COMMISSION County’s population growing

    On Tuesday, Triple S Executive Director Ryan Libke told the commission that data indicates the population in Shelby County is on a steady rise.

    Libke presented the report for January and said the month was a slower than what they had experienced in a while but February is making up for it.

    “February has turned out to be the better month than January and the year before January was better than February,” he said.

  • Judge denies temporary injunction for solar plant

    A Franklin Circuit judge has ruled against a request for a temporary injunction to prevent the construction of a project to build a solar energy field in Simpsonville.

    Judge Phillip J. Shepherd ruled Tuesday [Feb. 21] to deny the request filed by Gerald Karem, a property owner who lives near the site.

    Shepherd said in his ruling that the court may only grant a temporary injunction where it is clearly shown that the applicant’s rights are being violated or will suffered injury or loss.