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Local News

  • Biagi’s says goodbye

    For nearly a century, business at Biagi’s Appliance has been good. But as they say, all good things must come to an end.

    So as brothers Steve and Robert Biagi wrap up the store’s 90th anniversary, they are preparing to close the doors on the family business.

    Annibale Biagi established Biagi’s Appliances in downtown Shelbyville in 1927.  The business passed through the hands of their grandfather to their father, Vincent, and uncle, Hugh, before the brother’s joined them at the helm in 1993.

  • Triple S Planning Commission - Waddy gas station approved

    With what they expected to be a lengthy agenda on the table, the Triple S Planning Commission divided its regularly scheduled monthly meeting into two nights.

    Tuesday’s meeting was regular business, but Wednesday drew some back and forth debate from the audience concerning a Preliminary Planned Unit Development for a Speedway fuel station in Waddy.

  • Paving the way for safety

     

  • Fun on the farm

    The leaves on some trees were just beginning to turn subtle shades of crimson and yellow on Saturday, creating a perfect backdrop for a crisp fall day of lazy family fun for the entire community.

    The Good Neighbors Farm Tour was in its 5th year this past weekend and those who participated in the self-guided tour of nine local farms said they couldn’t remember a more enjoyable tour. 

  • Reprising a family role in history

    Almost like a family tradition, Mike Tracy will do his part to clean up downtown Shelbyville this weekend.

    The owner of Tracy’s Home Furnishings will don police attire to patrol downtown for the re-enactment of the shooting of Brig. Gen. Henry Denhardt, which took place 80 years ago and thrust Shelbyville into the national spotlight.

  • SHELBYVILLE CITY COUNCIL - Electric and natural gas franchises

    Up for discussion will be an ordinance creating and establishing a bid for a non-exclusive electric franchise and a non-exclusive natural gas franchise when the Shelbyville City Council convenes Thursday for its regularly scheduled meeting at 6:30 p.m. at city hall, 315 Washington Street.

    The new ordinance would allow for the placement of facilities for the transmission, distribution and sale of electrical energy within the public right-of-way of the city of Shelbyville for a 10-year duration and for natural gas for a 20-year duration.

  • Town hall talk on pensions

     Across the state, those who dedicate their lives to serving our communities are facing the challenge of an uncertain future with their retirement plans.

    The PFM Consulting Group, which was hired by the state, offered recommendations last month for Kentucky's pension systems that could save the state more than $1 billion a year.

    However, those recommendations have left many concerned, including members of the Shelby County Education Association.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD - Board approves 4 percent tax hike

     In a 3-2 split decision, the Shelby County school board members elected ultimately to adopt an increased property tax rate of .731 up from the current .715 per $100 of assessed value.

    The meeting opened with a public hearing on the matter and while no members of the community were present to speak for or against the proposed change, board members did not come to their decision lightly.

  • Painting by numbers

    If you noticed some roads throughout Shelby bearing freshly striped paint just before receiving a fresh coat of asphalt, your eyes were not deceiving you.

    Some roads that were being repaved were striped by mistake, officials said.

    Kentucky State Transportation Cabinet Public Information Officer Andrea Clifford said the striping contractor for Shelby’s state road projects is Reynolds Sealing and Striping Inc.

    However, officials from that company said they were not responsible.

  • Reading between the lines

    If you like nothing better than relaxing with a good book, then the upcoming Bookfest is right down your alley.

    Deloris Odenweller, an organizer of the yearly event, glanced around Wednesday at mounds of books lining the walls at The Sentinel-News, where for weeks people have been dropping off books to donate to the event, which will be Oct. 12-14.