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Elections

  • Secretary of State: Candidates believe in their backgrounds

    Bill Johnson said is running for Kentucky Secretary of State because he is concerned about the future of the commonwealth. Alison Lundergan Grimes said she is running because Kentuckians are hurting, and she thinks they need and deserve strong leaders.

    Grimes, the Democratic candidate, and Johnson, the Republican, will square off Tuesday on Election Day.

    Grimes, 32, is a business attorney, and she said she thinks her background is important to understand state and federal election laws as well as business laws in Kentucky.

  • ELECTION: GOP rides last bus to Election Day

    This week, it was the Republicans’ turn to stump in Shelbyville, when the Williams & Farmer Bus Tour rolled to a stop Tuesday morning at WJ Andriot’s on Main Street.

    With just one week until Election Day, a crowd of about 30 greeted state Sen. David Williams, the would-be governor, and outgoing Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer, the candidate for lieutenant governor, when the pair stepped off the bus, ready to talk about their come-from-behind effort against incumbent Gov. Steve Beshear and Jerry Abramson.

  • Election 2011: Farmer vs. a farmer to replace Farmer as ag commissioner

    One candidate to be Kentucky's Commissioner of Agriculture has done stand-up comedy. His opponent thinks his campaign is a joke.

    The Democratic candidate, Robert "Bob" Farmer of Louisville operates his own marketing firm, in addition to his occasional comedy performances. James Comer of Monroe County, the Republican candidate, is a farmer who has also served as a state representative.

  • State Treasurer: Candidates promise more efficiency on fewer dollars

    BARDSTOWN – The three candidates for state treasurer this fall all deliver the same message on its face: in tough economic times, Kentucky's government must do more with less.

    Incumbent Democrat Todd Hollenbach, looking to win his second term as treasurer, says by deploying a team of volunteers, he has created new initiatives without cost to the taxpayer.

    Republican K.C. Crosbie argues Hollenbach hasn't made wise decisions on how to reign in spending, and has neglected his duty as a check-and-balance on executive branch spending.

  • Democratic Bus Tour comes to Shelby Thursday

    Instead of stumping to a crowd of people strolling through Veterans’ Park on a lazy autumn afternoon, a bus full of Democratic candidates seeking statewide office ended up making their platform in the basement of the Shelby County Courthouse, out of the rain and gusting wind.

    A small crowd of about 25 people crowded into the hallway outside the Shelby County Sheriff’s Office on Thursday afternoon, and most of them were candidates and courthouse employees. Maybe half of them were from the public, including Democratic magistrates Tony Carriss and Hubie Pollett.

  • State Auditor: Political veteran Edelen, newcomer Kemper vie

    On Nov. 8, two candidates will vie to replace outgoing Kentucky State Auditor Crit Luallen.

    Adam Edelen, the Democratic candidate, and John T. Kemper, III, the Republican candidate, will go head-to-head to see who will fill that vacancy.

     

    Adam Edelen

    At 36, Adam Edelen may be young, but he has had a lot of experience in both business and government.

  • ELECTION: Abramson renews Shelby acquaintances

    Jerry Abramson, former longtime mayor of Louisville, now running for lieutenant governor on the Democratic ticket, stopped in a couple of downtown businesses Monday in a meet-and-greet capacity.

    Abramson, accompanied by his wife, Madeline, and political director Chad Aull, visited with patrons in McKinley’s Deli and Fat Tony’s Restaurant around lunchtime.

    “It was wonderful to see him come in here; he was very well-received,” Teresa McKinley said.

    Fat Tony’s owner, Tony Almeida, echoed those sentiments.

  • Williams' visit to Shelby is all about jobs plan

    With the campaign for governor heading toward its final month, State Senate President David Williams, the Republican who wants the job, brought his platform for economic reform to the Stratton Center in Shelbyville early Tuesday morning.

    An enthusiastic crowd of maybe two dozen of mostly Shelby County Republican leaders – and one curious student – listened attentively as Williams described not only what he thought was wrong with the business environment in the state but also the way Gov. Steve Beshear and President Barack Obama were doing their jobs.

  • Election 2011: Focus now turns to the race for governor

    After a disappointing loss in his first statewide race, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said he is not planning a comeback anytime soon, instead concentrating on what he said he does best.
    “My plans are to provide one-hundred percent of my attention to Shelby County,” said Rothenburger, who lost the Republican nomination for agriculture commissioner to state Rep. James Comer on Tuesday. “That’s my primary focus at this point.”

  • EARLIER: Primary Election 2011: Rob Rothenburger falls to James Comer in first statewide race

    After a vigorous go at his first statewide race, Shelby County Judge-Executive Rob Rothenburger said he is not too despondent at his defeat at the hands of state Rep. James R. Comer of Tompkinsville in the Republican primary for commissioner of agriculture.