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Elections

  • Election 2011: Beshear powers Democrats to victory in Shelby

    After big Republican victories in 2008 and 2010, Shelby County reversed that course in 2011, picking Democrats in four of six statewide races Tuesday.

    Democratic incumbent Gov. Steve Beshear and Lt. Gov. candidate Jerry Abramson, Alison Lundergan Grimes, Jack Conway and Adam Edelen all carried Shelby County.

  • Election 2011: Shelby’s turnout – 39% – nearly same as 2007

    Almost as many Shelby Countians showed up at the polls to send Gov. Steve Beshear back to office as helped elect him four years ago.

    More than a third of the registered voters turned out – 39 percent – falling short of Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry’s prediction of 50 percent but surpassing the 30 percent statewide and nearly equaling the 40 percent of Shelby Countians who voted in 2007.

  • Election 2011: Shelby’s turnout may surpass state

    “It’s sad when you think that if thirty percent vote, you’ve had a good turnout.”

    Those where the words of Shelby County Magistrate Bill Hedges in response to what many may consider a dreary report from County Clerk Sue Carol Perry about expectations for Election Day on Tuesday.

    But Perry said that’s only to be expected in this election.

    “It’s not a presidential election, and we have no local races, just state offices,” she said.

  • Election2011: On some issues, these attorneys not general

    Despite advertisements and debates to the contrary, attorney general candidates Jack Conway and Todd P'Pool do have a few things in common.

    Conway, the Democratic candidate and current attorney general, will face P'Pool, the Republican candidate, on Election Day, Nov. 8.

    Conway, 42, believes his record shows his dedication to the attorney general's office, a position he has held since 2008.

  • Election 2011: 3-man governor's race headed for finish line

    Three candidates are seeking the governor's seat in November. But, although each candidate has distinct differences, all agree that the economy and, more importantly, getting Kentuckians back to work, is among the top issues facing the Bluegrass state.

    Here is how they compare.

     

    Steve Beshear

    Currently serving his first term as governor, Steve Beshear, whose running mate is former Louisville Mayor Jerry Abramson, is a Clark County native.

  • Governor candidate Q&As

    These responses were collected by the Central Kentucky News-Journal in Campbellsville.

     

    Name, Age, City of Residence: Steven L. Beshear; 67; Clark County

     

    Office you are seeking: Governor

     

    Biographical Information:

     

  • Secretary of State: Candidates believe in their backgrounds

    Bill Johnson said is running for Kentucky Secretary of State because he is concerned about the future of the commonwealth. Alison Lundergan Grimes said she is running because Kentuckians are hurting, and she thinks they need and deserve strong leaders.

    Grimes, the Democratic candidate, and Johnson, the Republican, will square off Tuesday on Election Day.

    Grimes, 32, is a business attorney, and she said she thinks her background is important to understand state and federal election laws as well as business laws in Kentucky.

  • ELECTION: GOP rides last bus to Election Day

    This week, it was the Republicans’ turn to stump in Shelbyville, when the Williams & Farmer Bus Tour rolled to a stop Tuesday morning at WJ Andriot’s on Main Street.

    With just one week until Election Day, a crowd of about 30 greeted state Sen. David Williams, the would-be governor, and outgoing Agriculture Commissioner Richie Farmer, the candidate for lieutenant governor, when the pair stepped off the bus, ready to talk about their come-from-behind effort against incumbent Gov. Steve Beshear and Jerry Abramson.

  • Election 2011: Farmer vs. a farmer to replace Farmer as ag commissioner

    One candidate to be Kentucky's Commissioner of Agriculture has done stand-up comedy. His opponent thinks his campaign is a joke.

    The Democratic candidate, Robert "Bob" Farmer of Louisville operates his own marketing firm, in addition to his occasional comedy performances. James Comer of Monroe County, the Republican candidate, is a farmer who has also served as a state representative.

  • State Treasurer: Candidates promise more efficiency on fewer dollars

    BARDSTOWN – The three candidates for state treasurer this fall all deliver the same message on its face: in tough economic times, Kentucky's government must do more with less.

    Incumbent Democrat Todd Hollenbach, looking to win his second term as treasurer, says by deploying a team of volunteers, he has created new initiatives without cost to the taxpayer.

    Republican K.C. Crosbie argues Hollenbach hasn't made wise decisions on how to reign in spending, and has neglected his duty as a check-and-balance on executive branch spending.