• Shelby tops state in GOP voter turnout

    Live music, lunch, candidates talking to voters, Saturday’s first Republican Presidential Caucus seemed more like a spring festival – especially with the driving rain – than a voting primary.

    “It’s been extremely crowded, we’ve been very pleased,” Shelby County GOP chair Janet Cuthrell said Saturday afternoon. “It’s no surprise [why], we’re making history.”

  • Historic opportunity for KY GOP

    Next weekend Kentucky Republicans will have the opportunity to be a part of history as the state hosts the first Republican presidential caucus.

  • James Gould vying for Senate seat

    With U.S. Senator Rand Paul focused on two different political offices, Lexington financial analyst James Gould is peering through the opened window of opportunity and eyeing Paul’s seat on the Senate.

    The 47-year-old Lexington native has little political experience, with an unsuccessful run for city council at the age of 21, but says he is eager to bring numerous important issues to the table.

    Gould said some of those issues include campaign finance reform and the military, noting suspected matters of contamination surrounding the Blue Grass Army Depot.

  • ELECTION 2016: Crowded Shelbyville City Council field will have a primary

    While the Republican Presidential Caucus has received most of the publicity for the early election cycle in the state, Shelby County will still have a Republican Primary on May 17.

    As the deadline to file as a candidate for the 2016 election passed on Tuesday, Shelby County was left with eight Republican challengers for the Shelbyville City Council and two challengers for the Republican nomination for the 58th House District, which consists of only Shelby County.

  • Caucus is a go

    The state’s Republican Party has made history in the commonwealth. On August 22, the GOP voted in favor by two-thirds majority to replace the Republican May presidential primary with a March caucus.

    Mike Biagi, executive director of the Republican Party and a Shelbyville native, said that switching to a caucus would increase the value of the state’s decision.

  • Democrat dinner fills guests’ minds

    With a focus on raising their voter turnout, the Shelby County Democratic Party enjoyed a warm meal at Claudia Sanders Dinner House Monday evening served with a side of various political addresses.

    The event drew a crowd of more than 200, among which included local Democrats Shelbyville Mayor Tom Hardesty, Shelbyville City Council members Donna Eaton and Mike Zoeller, Simpsonville City Administrator David Eaton, Shelby County Magistrates Hubie Pollett, Eddie Kingsolver, County Clerk Sue Carole Perry and Jailer Bobby Waits, among others.

  • ELECTION 2015 – Republican bus tour stops in Shelby

    With just days left on the calendar before Election Day, political candidates are hot on the campaign trail, hoping to get their names in as many households as possible.

    “Last week we traveled two-thousand miles,” said State Rep. Ryan Quarles (R-Georgetown) a candidate for Kentucky Agriculture Commissioner. 

    On Thursday, Andriot’s Paint Flooring and Blinds joined Quarles’ list of campaign stops as he and Allison Ball, the Republican nominee for Kentucky Treasurer, for a quick meet and greet with the community.

  • Recanvass called for in GOP race for Governor’s nomination

     After months of cutthroat campaigning and debating for the GOP nomination for the November Governor election, it was Matt Bevinthat came out on top after Tuesday’s primary’s with a slim win by less than 100 votes.

    However, victory could be cut short for Bevin. The Secretary of State’s office announced Wednesday that Bevin’s opponent James Comer, who came in second with a furious rally of votes from Western Kentucky, officially requested a recanvass, which will be conducted on May 28 at 9 a.m.

  • Officials prepare for a quiet Election Day

    As the May 19 Primary Election edges closer, officials say they believe the voter turnout will be slim this year, at least as far as the Democratic Party is concerned.

    “The Democrats don’t have much of a ballot at all. I think the Republicans will turn out, but I don’t see a big turn out for the Democrats,” Shelby County Clerk Sue Carol Perry said.

    “But usually on the primaries we’ll only have like thirty percent or twenty percent turnout.”

  • SCPS librarian setting standards

    Shelby County Public School’s librarian Kathy Mansfield, who is currently on a memorandum of agreement with the Kentucky Department of Education, has been selected to serve in a unique and historic position with the American Association of School Librarians.

    Mansfield was recently named to the AASL editorial board, where she will serve a vital role in updating the learning standards and guidelines for the association.