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Elections

  • Recanvass called for in GOP race for Governor’s nomination

     After months of cutthroat campaigning and debating for the GOP nomination for the November Governor election, it was Matt Bevinthat came out on top after Tuesday’s primary’s with a slim win by less than 100 votes.

    However, victory could be cut short for Bevin. The Secretary of State’s office announced Wednesday that Bevin’s opponent James Comer, who came in second with a furious rally of votes from Western Kentucky, officially requested a recanvass, which will be conducted on May 28 at 9 a.m.

  • Officials prepare for a quiet Election Day

    As the May 19 Primary Election edges closer, officials say they believe the voter turnout will be slim this year, at least as far as the Democratic Party is concerned.

    “The Democrats don’t have much of a ballot at all. I think the Republicans will turn out, but I don’t see a big turn out for the Democrats,” Shelby County Clerk Sue Carol Perry said.

    “But usually on the primaries we’ll only have like thirty percent or twenty percent turnout.”

  • Bevin brings answers to Shelby campaign stop

    Just six weeks after visiting Shelby Industries, Matt Bevin, Republican candidate for governor, and his running mate for lieutenant governor Jenean Hampton, were back in Shelby County Monday for a brief question-and-answer session for the community.

    In contrast to their first Shelby County stop at a large industry, the campaign trail this time led them to a small privately-owned downtown Shelbyville restaurant, The Bell House, which operates with just a handful of employees.

  • Comer selects Shelby grad for youth campaign chair

    Across the state, Kentucky Commissioner of Agriculture James Comer is working on his campaign to become Kentucky’s next governor, and he has recruited 2014 Shelby County High School graduate Matthew Smith to aid in his campaign here in Shelby County.

    Along with a handful of others across the state, Smith was selected to serve as a Youth Chair for Comer’s campaign in Shelby County.

    “I know Matt through his leadership in the Republican Party. He represents the future of our state and is an asset to the Shelby County community,” Comer said.

  • Signs, signs, everywhere signs

    After spending months driving through a gauntlet of campaign signs that seemed to stretch from one end of the county to the other, residents can finally reclaim their picturesque views of the rolling hills and horse farms.

    This week as holiday décor goes up for Celebration of Lights, the political signs are coming down.

    But where do they go? Are they quickly trucked to the Waddy Convenience Center or left to litter our lawns?

  • Council to remain unchanged

    The more things change, the more they stay same with the Shelbyville City Council. All six incumbents on the council will return after taking the top six spots in a nine-person election Tuesday.

    Republican Jon Swindler, who has served on the council for eight non-consecutive years, received the most votes with 12.58 percent while Republican Bobby Andriot was elected just two votes behind at 12.57 percent. Rounding out the votes were Republican Frank Page, 11.2 percent, and Democrats Donna Eaton, 12 percent, Shane Suttor, 11.2 percent, and Mike Zoeller, 10.7 percent.

  • McConnell tops Grimes to retains spot in U.S. Senate

     

    Incumbent Republican Mitch McConnell has maintained his position as U.S. Senator Tuesday by beating out his Democratic opponent Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

    The race was called shortly after the polls closed.

    In Shelby County, McConnell dominated Grimes 60.86 percent to 36.47 percent, beating her by nearly 4,000 votes.

    A posting on Mitch McConnell’s Facebook page thanked voters for their support, stating, “Thanks to supporters like you, we won a historic victory for Kentucky and America tonight.”

  • Several new workers will handle big election

    After facing a shortage of poll workers less than a month ago, Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry said our poll should be in good shape Tuesday for Election Day.

    “I’ve got one hundred and fifty-six [volunteers],” she said.

    Perry explained that the law requires two democrat and two republican volunteers at each of the 34 polling precincts for a total of 136 workers, leaving her with 20 alternates.

  • Election 2014: U.S. House of Representatives

    Thomas Massie, a Tea Party-backed Republican who was active along and against party lines during his first term in Congress, is running for a second term as U.S. representative in Kentucky’s 4th District, which includes Shelby County.

    Massie, who took over the district in 2012 when Republican Geoff Davis abruptly resigned, defeated six Republicans in the primary and routed Democrat Bill Adkins by 27 points in the General Election.

    He will face Democrat challenger Peter Newberry on Election Day.

  • ELECTION 2014: U.S. House of Representatives

    Peter Newberry is running as a Democrat for Congress in Northern Kentucky, but his platform doesn’t sound like the average Democrat’s.

    The Newport coffee shop owner, lawyer, and farmer says he’s a fiscal conservative who hates government regulations and thinks there are too many laws.

    “A lot of the things the tea party stands for, I believe in also,” Newberry said. “Some of the tea party people that get elected to office become like the people they vow to replace and change. Once in power, they stay in power.”