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Elections

  • Signs, signs, everywhere signs

    After spending months driving through a gauntlet of campaign signs that seemed to stretch from one end of the county to the other, residents can finally reclaim their picturesque views of the rolling hills and horse farms.

    This week as holiday décor goes up for Celebration of Lights, the political signs are coming down.

    But where do they go? Are they quickly trucked to the Waddy Convenience Center or left to litter our lawns?

  • Council to remain unchanged

    The more things change, the more they stay same with the Shelbyville City Council. All six incumbents on the council will return after taking the top six spots in a nine-person election Tuesday.

    Republican Jon Swindler, who has served on the council for eight non-consecutive years, received the most votes with 12.58 percent while Republican Bobby Andriot was elected just two votes behind at 12.57 percent. Rounding out the votes were Republican Frank Page, 11.2 percent, and Democrats Donna Eaton, 12 percent, Shane Suttor, 11.2 percent, and Mike Zoeller, 10.7 percent.

  • McConnell tops Grimes to retains spot in U.S. Senate

     

    Incumbent Republican Mitch McConnell has maintained his position as U.S. Senator Tuesday by beating out his Democratic opponent Secretary of State Alison Lundergan Grimes.

    The race was called shortly after the polls closed.

    In Shelby County, McConnell dominated Grimes 60.86 percent to 36.47 percent, beating her by nearly 4,000 votes.

    A posting on Mitch McConnell’s Facebook page thanked voters for their support, stating, “Thanks to supporters like you, we won a historic victory for Kentucky and America tonight.”

  • Several new workers will handle big election

    After facing a shortage of poll workers less than a month ago, Shelby County Clerk Sue Carole Perry said our poll should be in good shape Tuesday for Election Day.

    “I’ve got one hundred and fifty-six [volunteers],” she said.

    Perry explained that the law requires two democrat and two republican volunteers at each of the 34 polling precincts for a total of 136 workers, leaving her with 20 alternates.

  • Election 2014: U.S. House of Representatives

    Thomas Massie, a Tea Party-backed Republican who was active along and against party lines during his first term in Congress, is running for a second term as U.S. representative in Kentucky’s 4th District, which includes Shelby County.

    Massie, who took over the district in 2012 when Republican Geoff Davis abruptly resigned, defeated six Republicans in the primary and routed Democrat Bill Adkins by 27 points in the General Election.

    He will face Democrat challenger Peter Newberry on Election Day.

  • ELECTION 2014: U.S. House of Representatives

    Peter Newberry is running as a Democrat for Congress in Northern Kentucky, but his platform doesn’t sound like the average Democrat’s.

    The Newport coffee shop owner, lawyer, and farmer says he’s a fiscal conservative who hates government regulations and thinks there are too many laws.

    “A lot of the things the tea party stands for, I believe in also,” Newberry said. “Some of the tea party people that get elected to office become like the people they vow to replace and change. Once in power, they stay in power.”

  • Dutton seeks re-election

    An incumbent district judge is seeking re-election in Division 2 in the 53rd Judicial District.

    Donna Dutton, 49, is vying against attorney Emily Farrar-Crockett to keep the seat she has held since being elected in 2006.

    She said being a judge is important to her because she provides a source of stability in the district court arena.

  • ELECTION 2014: District Judge, Division II

    A Louisville attorney is challenging an incumbent district judge for the Division II seat in the judicial race.

    Emily Farrar-Crockett, an attorney with the law firm, McClain DeWees in Louisville, lives in Finchville with her husband and their two children.

    Farrar-Crockett is a member of the criminal and defense bar and is experienced in immigration and juvenile law and has practiced in numerous district, circuit and family courts, the Kentucky Supreme Court and in federal courts throughout the nation.

  • Lumber manager and coach vying for magisterial seat

    A newcomer to the political arena is running for an open magisterial seat in District 3 being vacated by longtime Magistrate Allen Ruble, who announced last year that he would not be seeking a 4th term.

    Matt Samples, 30, a Democrat, is estimator and job manager at Penrod Lumber and Fence Company. He is also head football coach at East Middle School.

    Mike Miller, a Republican, is also vying for the seat.

  • Former city councilman runs for magistrate

    A former 5-term Shelbyville City Councilman is running for an open seat in magisterial District 3 being vacated by longtime Magistrate Allen Ruble, who announced last year that he would not be seeking a 4th term.

    Mike Miller, a Republican, is a Shelby County real estate agent, who served on the Shelbyville City Council from 1998 to 2008,

    Matt Samples, a Democrat, is also vying for the seat.