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Education

  • EARLIER: Back from tragedy: Barnett selected as Homecoming queen

    Shelby County High School senior Lana Jo Barnett was elected Homecoming queen for 2009.

    Barnett was escorted across the field by an ROTC cadet to take her place of honor on the stage during halftime of Friday's game.

    Barnett's crowning was a significant achievement for her. She was severely injured in a ATV accident in 2004.

  • EARLIER: Progress report: Elementaries lead the way

    Shelby County’s elementary school students are showing excellent progress in their capabilities,  but the middle schools and high schools aren’t improving quite as well.

    Those assessments are established by the No Child Left Behind’s Annual Yearly Progress reports, which will be released today by the state.

  • EARLIER: Obama speech to students optional in Shelby schools

    When President Barack Obama addresses American students Tuesday through TV and the Internet, Shelby County’s school principals will decide if local students get to see it.

    Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof gave the option to the schools, which in turn would notify parents of their decisions either through a note or by using the OneCall Now system.

  • Art for the ages

    Most of us know the story of how Michelangelo lay on his back as he painted his incredible mural of God and man on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, his skill, love and genius coming together to create an artistic gift for the ages.

    Though it might not be quite of the same historical proportions, some richly talented art students and their teacher have created their own impressive work of art on a ceiling right here in Shelby County.

  • Art for the ages

    Most of us know the story of how Michelangelo lay on his back as he painted his incredible mural of God and man on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, his skill, love and genius coming together to create an artistic gift for the ages.

    Though it might not be quite of the same historical proportions, some richly talented art students and their teacher have created their own impressive work of art on a ceiling right here in Shelby County.

  • Obama pushes education, not policy

    When President Barack Obama took over televisions and computer screens nationwide Tuesday, Phil Bell’s junior history class was quietly watching and listening at Shelby County High School.

    After a week of controversy swirling around Obama’s plan to speak directly to the youth of America in a televised address and spreading concerns that the President would push his political policies in his speech, all the hype ended when he gave little more than a tough parent talk, according to Bell’s students.

  • Simpsonville academies report record test results

    Our Lady of Guadalupe Academy and Corpus Christi High School in Simpsonville is reporting the highest results on standardized tests in its 10-year history.

    Students in the high school scored an average of 33 on the American College Test, which would put them in the 99th percentile for college-bound seniors, the school reported, and students were in the 94th percentile for their SAT scores.

  • U of L president Ramsey visits SCHS

    A day before the big University of Kentucky-University of Louisville football game, Shelby County High School got a dose of red.

    But U of L President James Ramsey wasn’t at SCHS Friday to push for support of his Cardinals squad. He wasn’t even there to partake in the Rockets’ homecoming fun.

    He was there to address the senior students about the importance of continuing their education at the college level.

  • Officials blame new requirements for lower ACT scores

    More Shelby County students have spent a day bubbling in answers on the ACT lately, but scores for the county, along with the state, were down last year.

    The ACT, a standardized test routinely used as part of the formula for college admission, helps predict how well high school students will do in college.

    A total of 345 members of the Shelby County High School Class of 2009 took the ACT, which is 125 more than the Class of 2008.

  • Shelby native Hatchell to head Collins HS

    A high school named for a familiar person will be headed by a principal with a familiar name.

    Anthony Hatchell, who left Shelby County to pursue athletics and education, will return next month as the first principal of the new Martha Layne Collins High School.

    Hatchell, an educator for more than 30 years who has spent the past four as principal of Mayfield High School in western Kentucky, said he is excited to be coming home to the county where his parents and sister still live.