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Education

  • Extra winter break comes at a cost

    While students across the county are enjoying their surprise winter break this week, some might not be so pleased come May as their school year extends into June.

    With four cancelled school days this week and another one in Novmeber the district has now added a week to the original school calendar. Students were out of school on Feb. 13 for a teacher’s professional development day and Monday in recognition of President’s Day

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – District prepping for 1st Share Fair

    When the Shelby County Board of Education convened Thursday at Clear Creek Elementary School Staff Developer Lora Shields updated the board on the second strand of the district’s Strategic Leadership Plan: 21st Century Professionals.

    According to Shields, the district’s Technology Integration Coach Adam Watson is preparing for the district’s first Share Fair.

    Nine teachers from the district were selected.

  • An updated name for an updated building

    A new committee will look to put help complete the renovation of the old Southside gymnasium with a new name to go along with its new set of amenities.

    The building was left standing with the old school was torn down to make room for the new Southside Elementary School, which opened this year.

    Currently tabbed as Area C by the developers, the old Southside space is under renovation, which should be completed in the next few weeks.

  • Start behind, stay behind

    The latest research of Kentucky students confirmed a truth most educators are already aware of and many young parents fear –only half of our children are prepared for kindergarten.

    The study, based on kindergarten entrance screenings, revealed that only 50 percent of Kentucky children entering kindergarten are ready to do so.  While the number is slightly higher in Shelby County –56 percent– it’s still leaves nearly 5 out of 10 Shelby County kids unprepared to start school.

  • SCHS principal ready to retire

    Having served in the education field for 32 years, Shelby County High School Principal Eddie Oakley says he’s ready to start a new chapter.

    Though he has enjoyed the journey, Oakley said it’s time to retire and explore different paths.

    “I don’t know what I’m going to do yet,” he said. “Its just time to do something else.”

    Oakley said he might use his free time to flip houses or visit his son in Australia.

  • The line between privacy and protection

    When it comes to student searches, at what point do school personnel cross the line between the school’s rights to protect and the student’s rights to privacy?

    While it is true that authorized school employees have the right to search students without consent, one Shelby County High School father believes the district crossed the line between protection and invasion and is performing random searches without justification.

  • Parents outraged at SCPS handling of Death Note

    A note discovered at East Middle School last week has left several students feeling unsafe during the school day and numerous parents enraged.

    The note, according to a parent, contained a list of student’s names and was titled Death Note and the district says it’s considered a play on Japanese anime series of the same name.

    The series features a student that finds a notebook that will bring death upon any person whose name is written within.

  • Titans help peer battle cancer woes

    Collins High School classrooms were with filled yellow shirts instead of the school’s normal Titan blue as students took the opportunity to support one of their own.

    While Keaton McMurray isn’t competing for a football state championship or suiting up for the basketball team, he is fighting for a huge win and he has the support of all his classmates.

    McMurray, a Collins senior, has osteosarcoma, a type of bone cancer that usually develops in adolescents.

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – ATC expansion to broaden Career Villages

    The Shelby County Board of Education got a sneak peak of the district’s modern education tactics on Thursday when Assistant Superintendent Kerry Whitehouse and Tommy Hurt, the district’s chief information officer, gave a report on 21st Century Support Systems, the fifth strand of the Strategic Leadership Plan.

    While the district’s one-to-one computing plan calls for each high school student this year to receive a digital device, the district has still not been able to secure funding.

  • District starts budget process

    The Shelby County Board of Education accepted the first draft budget for the 2015-16 school year Thursday night and based on projections using last year’s funding, the district is expecting a $538,162 increase in local General Fund receipts.

    That good news is short lived, however, as the district also expects to see expenses increase by almost double that amount, with a little more than $1 million expected in expenditures.