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Education

  • SCPS schools: Not all roads take students to school

    There is sure to be a lot of yawning, stretching and blurry eyes this morning as students roll into school for the first day of the 2013-14 school year at Shelby County Public Schools.

    And it’s inevitable that some buses will be early and some late as the drivers and those students they pick up adjust to the routes.

    But how are those routes set? How do the buses know what roads to take, where to turn and how early to leave?

  • School’s in on Wednesday

    With the start of school coming up on Wednesday, teachers, students and parents are gearing up for the 2013-14 school year.

    And, according to the National Retail Federation, that means about $26.7 billion will be pumped into the economy for school supplies, new clothes and electronics. Including those going to college that works out to about $634 per shopper on apparel, shoes, supplies and electronics.

  • SCPS to launch new teacher evaluations

    As the school year gets under way, students won’t be the only ones facing new standards from new teachers.

    The Kentucky Department of Education is requiring school districts across the commonwealth to have one tenth of their schools start using the new Next Generation Teacher Standards. This pilot program started last year with volunteer schools and will include every school district this year.

  • Shelby County schools' ACT scores take a hit

    Shelby County Public Schools didn’t make progress among its juniors last year toward the goal of having all students college and career ready, a trend administrators say requires a new approach.

    Juniors for 2012-13 didn’t perform as well the previous class had on the ACT, although the district’s composite score was flat from 2011-12.

    That composite of 18.8 also left students performing well below the ACT- and state-set benchmarks that predict success in college, members of the Shelby County School Board heard Thursday.

  • Shelby County School Board: State to release junior ACT scores

    The Shelby County Board of Education will review the ACT scores for its 2012-13 juniors during Thursday’s regular meeting, at 7 p.m. at district’s offices, 1133 Main Street.

    The state of Kentucky requires all high school juniors to take the ACT in the spring.

    Last year’s results were a mix for the district. Although the schools continued to show solid improvements, the scores still trailed ACT and state benchmarks that predict success in college.

  • Shelby County School Board: Compromise OKd in pay scale for subs

    The Shelby County School Board approved on Thursday a 2013-14 pay schedule for substitute teachers that included budget cuts that will save the district more than $143,000.
    However, the decrease in pay is less than what had been proposed in February that would have saved the district $200,000. That initial change was part of a large proposal from the district’s budget committee that included eliminating nearly $2 million and about 26 jobs from the district's budget.

  • Shelby County School Board: Board to revisit, study substitute teacher pay

    The Shelby County Board of Education will review its 2013-14 pay schedule for substitute teachers after a workshop to discuss the plan during Thursday’s regular meeting at the board’s offices, 1155 Main Street, Shelbyville.

  • Neihof receives ‘Excellent’ review

    The Shelby County Board of Education approved and read its 2013 evaluation of Superintendent James Neihof during Thursday’s regular meeting at the board offices at 1155 Main Street.

    Of the nine professional standards used in the review, Neihof’s average grade was “Excellent.” National and state associations developed the standards, and the rating range is Unacceptable, Needs Improvement, Good, Excellent and Outstanding.

  • Shelby County School Board: Districtwide accreditation will be pursued

    Shelby County Public Schools continues to advance in a working toward a district-wide accreditation through the AdvancED process.

    During Thursday’s regular meeting, the school board approved the participation in the process, and Superintendent James Neihof presented the board with a copy of the district’s self assessment, which was sent to AdvancED to begin the process.

    The board first heard of the process during a February meeting at which board chair Doug Butler questioned the process.

  • Shelby County School Board: Superintendent to get annual public review

    The Shelby County Board of Education will present its annual public review of Superintendent James Neihof at Thursday’s regular meeting at the board’s offices, 1155 Main Street Shelbyville.

    This will be Neihof’s fourth review from the board, with the last three all having an average score of Excellent – the state-provided review has a range of Unacceptable, Needs Improvement, Good, Excellent and Outstanding.

    Under state law the board is allowed first to present the review to Neihof in closed session, which it did at a meeting on June 13.