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Education

  • EARLIER: Acklin receives Teacher Achievement Award

    Shelby County educators continue to rack up honors for their quality of work.

    Artavia Acklin, a third-grade teacher at Clear Creek Elementary, has been named by the Kentucky Department of Education as one of 24 winners of the 2010 Ashland Inc. Teacher Achievement Awards and is a finalist to be named the state's teacher of the year.

  • Local tutoring program receives state award

    Hispanic students have found a friend in Shelbyville. And on Wednesday, the Kentucky Board of Education took notice, presenting the annual Dr. Samuel Robinson Award to Arriba Niños.

    The Arriba Niños (Upward Children) program was established by four Shelby County churches in 2003 to assistance Hispanic students with their schoolwork and to help with English Language Learning.

  • Wicker excels on test

    Amanda Catherine Wicker, a student at Shelby County High School, has been named a Commended Student in the 2010 National Merit Scholarship Program after scoring in the top five percent of students taking the 2008 Preliminary SAT/National Merit Scholarship qualifying test.

    She is among some 34,000 students to receive recognition for excellent academic promise. More than 1.5 million students entered the competition by taking the test. Wicker will continue in the 2010 competition for the National Merit Scholarship.

  • Job Corps celebrates 45 years

     

    A ceremony Wednesday celebrated the 45-year history of Job Corps nationwide and honored its present contributions to its students and communities.

  • EARLIER: Back from tragedy: Barnett selected as Homecoming queen

    Shelby County High School senior Lana Jo Barnett was elected Homecoming queen for 2009.

    Barnett was escorted across the field by an ROTC cadet to take her place of honor on the stage during halftime of Friday's game.

    Barnett's crowning was a significant achievement for her. She was severely injured in a ATV accident in 2004.

  • EARLIER: Progress report: Elementaries lead the way

    Shelby County’s elementary school students are showing excellent progress in their capabilities,  but the middle schools and high schools aren’t improving quite as well.

    Those assessments are established by the No Child Left Behind’s Annual Yearly Progress reports, which will be released today by the state.

  • EARLIER: Obama speech to students optional in Shelby schools

    When President Barack Obama addresses American students Tuesday through TV and the Internet, Shelby County’s school principals will decide if local students get to see it.

    Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof gave the option to the schools, which in turn would notify parents of their decisions either through a note or by using the OneCall Now system.

  • Art for the ages

    Most of us know the story of how Michelangelo lay on his back as he painted his incredible mural of God and man on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, his skill, love and genius coming together to create an artistic gift for the ages.

    Though it might not be quite of the same historical proportions, some richly talented art students and their teacher have created their own impressive work of art on a ceiling right here in Shelby County.

  • Art for the ages

    Most of us know the story of how Michelangelo lay on his back as he painted his incredible mural of God and man on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel in Rome, his skill, love and genius coming together to create an artistic gift for the ages.

    Though it might not be quite of the same historical proportions, some richly talented art students and their teacher have created their own impressive work of art on a ceiling right here in Shelby County.

  • Obama pushes education, not policy

    When President Barack Obama took over televisions and computer screens nationwide Tuesday, Phil Bell’s junior history class was quietly watching and listening at Shelby County High School.

    After a week of controversy swirling around Obama’s plan to speak directly to the youth of America in a televised address and spreading concerns that the President would push his political policies in his speech, all the hype ended when he gave little more than a tough parent talk, according to Bell’s students.