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Education

  • Back to school: Smooth sailing

     

  • Preliminary testing shows improvement

    The Shelby County Board of Education got to walk through the district's first year of MAP data during Thursday's meeting and to learn how administration and teachers can use the data to track learning by school, grade, class and individual student.

    Kerry Fannin, the assistant superintendent for student achievement, and Lisa Smith, the director of student programs and services, led two groups that showed how the district is able to breakdown the data.

  • Earlier rises may be in store for students

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  • Cornerstone expanding, growing

    Cornerstone Christian Academy will open on Aug. 16 with a few more students and a lot more to offer them.

    During  the summer, the school has received three generous donations that are helping expand educational opportunities at the small private school east of Shelbyville.

    "We put our desires and needs out there mainly by word of mouth and through our school board, and we have a great group of generous benefactors that want to see us continue to grow," Headmaster David Ladner said.

  • School's out for veteran teacher Jennings

    In 1966 Ernestine Jennings graduated from Shelby County High School, and now, for the second time, she's leaving the school.

    After teaching for 41 years, the first six at Shelbyville High School, and the rest at SCHS, Jennings, 61, has retired.

    "It just seemed like the right time," she said. "I've been thinking about it for a while, the first time in 2002. But then I just decided I wasn't quite ready."

  • The man with the power wants to reduce it

    With six school districts to cover, Sherman Adams will be burning the midnight oil. But don't worry, as the new Energy Manager for the districts, Adams will be sure to turn the lights off when he leaves.

    His office will be at Shelby County's Public School's central office, but Adams will also split his time among the Henry County, Trimble County, Anchorage, Eminence and Frankfort school districts.

    "But since Shelby County is the largest district, it will get about 60 percent of my time," Adams said.

  • East Middle School gets new leader

    Christine Powell will take over as the new principal at East Middle School this year, Shelby County Public Schools announced.

    Powell, who lives in Lawrenceburg, comes to Shelby County from the Kentucky Department of Education, where she has been a director of secondary and virtual learning since 2008.

    "When you look at the leadership, the school system, the climate and culture, everything going on with programs and initiatives...this is a progressive district and I want to be part of that," she said in a press release.

  • Heritage principal moves to new role

    Heritage Elementary Principal Cindy French is moving on, but she isn't going too far.

    After four years, French will leave Heritage Elementary on Thursday, becoming the new Director of Elementary Schools for Shelby County Public Schools.

    Her new position includes working with all the elementary school principals in the district and overseeing classroom instruction and leading student achievement consultants.

  • Students' project supports children in Africa

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  • More kids staying in school, graduating

    Shelby County Public Schools showed strong improvement in graduation numbers according to the state’s non-academic report this year, the district did struggle in other areas.

    Shelby County dropped more than 3 percent in the Transition Into Adult Life category, falling behind the state average for the first time in three years. Shelby checks in almost 1 percent behind the state’s 97 percent.