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Education

  • School board may choose architects

    The Shelbyville Board of Education should finally choose at this week’s meeting the architects for the two new construction projects it has planned.

    The selections for the new buildings at the Southside and Northside locations are the only action items on agenda for the meeting at 7 p.m. Thursday at Simpsonville Elementary.

    However, the board will recognize the Shelby County High School Marine Corps JROTC air rifle team for its national championship and Heritage Elementary for its School to Career video.

  • Smith named SCPS deputy superintendent

    Lisa Smith is moving on and up but not out of Shelby County Public Schools.

    Effective July 1, Smith will move from director of student programs to chief academic officer/deputy superintendent for SCPS.

    Smith, who has been a teacher in Franklin County and a principal and administrator in Shelby, said originally leaving the classroom was difficult.

  • SCHS students honored at board meeting

    School board members were treated to student video presentations at Thursday night’s board meeting at Central Office.

    Three Shelby County High School students, Michaela Stoudemire, Matthew Perry and Sarah Durham, were presented awards of recognition after the audience watched their presentations.

    Shelby County High School teachers Julie Webb and Kathy Wrightson introduced the presentations, describing them as digital storytelling by the students as part of the TAG (Talented and Gifted) Program, using photos accompanied by music.

  • Shelby County schools staying ahead of new state testing process

    With the announcement on Friday that NCS Pearson Inc. will be one of the main vendors, the Kentucky Department of Education’s new accountability system is coming into focus.

    NCS Pearson will handle the content-area tests for students in grades 3-8 and writing assessments for high school students.

    However, the end-of-course assessments for algebra II, English II, U.S. history and biology to determine if students have mastered those subjects have not been awarded.

  • Schools to expand engineering and biomedical courses

    Shelby County Public Schools continue to lead the way in engineering and biomedical science classes.

    The district learned this week that the Project Lead The Way (PLTW) courses will continue to expand at Collins and Shelby County high schools.

    Shelby County is one of just 17 schools to earn the $50,000 biomedical sciences grant, and Collins is one of just four to earn the grant in engineering and one of only three to earn an additional $25,000 grant for a gateway to engineering track for eighth-grade students.

  • ‘Inspiring’ goals set for schools

    The Shelby County School Board set the district goals for the 2011-2012 school year on Thursday, focusing again on the new Kentucky Core Academic Standards along with measurable improvement in the classroom.

    Superintendent James Neihof described the board goals as “inspiring.”

    “It becomes more clear each time we put our heads together about academic achievement that we all want what is best for students,” he said.

  • Accelerated Academies draw plenty of interest

    Shelby County Public Schools is moving ahead with the formation of the Accelerated Academies at both high schools.

    Shelby County and Collins high schools invited parents to informational meetings last week, and both turnouts were successful. Superintendent James Neihof noted that there were more than 100 at each event.

  • These books you can sink your teeth into

    Cookbooks are always a good source for food inspiration, but Collins High School teachers Beth Jones and Bethany Farmer suggested their students look a little deeper.

    Jones, the library media specialist, and Farmer, the family and consumer science teacher, banded together to have students from a culinary arts class work on an edible book show.

    “I get a newsletter from the library, and one month it had an article on edible book shows, so I talked to Mrs. Farmer, and we both though ‘Let’s do it,’” Jones said.

  • Graduation set for June 4 at the high schools’ gyms

    Seniors at Shelby County and Collins high schools now know when – and where – they will receive their diplomas.

    At the school board meeting March 10, the school calendar was adjusted to move the last day of school June 3, and now graduation will follow on June 4 at the schools’ gyms – ending many years of commencements at the Frankfort Civic Center.

    Shelby County High School will have graduation at 1 p.m., and Collins will follow at 7 p.m.

  • Schools doing OK vs. board’s goals

    Shelby County Public Schools showed overall good performance against the goals the school board set for its 2010-11 school year, but there also are some areas in which aggressive goals weren’t met.

    That was the assessment the board heard at its meeting Thursday night during a review of the goals, which center on the district’s 5 Main Things of Curriculum Alignment, Instructional Norms, Professional Learning Communities, Intervention and Enrichment.