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Education

  • Shelby County School Board: Sams excited for first meeting

    When the Shelby County Board of Education meets tomorrow at the district’s offices, new member Karen Sams said she will be ready to get involved quickly.

     “I’m excited, and really looking forward to receiving a budget,” she said. “I’ve already taken some training through the KSBA’s [the Kentucky School Boards Association] online leadership institute. It was very good for first-time board members, and there’s already another training session set up in February.”

  • Shelby student is playing with his future

    When Seth England took off for Eastern Kentucky University in 2011, he already had set his sights on a degree in computer science with a focus on programming, but at that time he couldn’t have known he would-be designing a game in Redmond, Wash., a year later.

    A 4.0 student at Shelby County High School and in that first year at EKU, England decided to apply for admittance to DigiPen Institute of Technology, a prestigious school focused on computer science, engineering and art, with an emphasis on creating video games.

  • School district is dark in shutdown

    If Shelby County Public Schools buildings look even darker than usual this week, it’s because they are.

    For the first time, the district has instituted a furlough week for administrators during the holiday break. This cost-saving measure that allows the district to save on administration salaries and on utility bills at the schools by dropping the energy consumption to the lowest levels possible.

  • How schools are protecting our students

    In the wake of the tragedy at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn., on Friday in which left 26 dead, including 20 students, Shelby County Public Schools Superintendent James Neihof was quick to let parents know that SCPS has been and is continuing to do it all it can to keep students safe.

    “We sent an E-mail to parents last night [Sunday] and to staff,” he said. “We also put a statement on our Web site.”

  • Louisville company hired to build Southside Elementary

    The Shelby County School Board Thursday voted night to award the construction project for Southside Elementary School to a Louisville company with which the board has worked on previous projects.

  • 2 former Shelby dropouts complete diplomas

    Devon Hickey and Analley Grave, who once left school without graduating, received their high school diplomas in a brief but touching ceremony held before the school board meeting Thursday night

    The graduates made a short “walk” to the front of the room, to the music of “Pomp and Circumstance,” and received their diplomas from Superintendent James Neihof, accompanied by their principals, Eddie Oakley of Shelby County High School and John Leeper of Collins.

  • Economics lesson turns into community outreach

    The fourth-grade teachers at Heritage Elementary School wanted to put together a program to teach their students about economics.

    So teachers Sarah Beth Gomelsky, Kristen Hart and Devon Scrogham put together a unit where the students purchase raw materials, create an item and then sell those items on the “open market” at school.

    The students created bracelets and necklaces out of yarn and beads out of beeswax, and sold them to the student body for one week before school.

  • Shelby County School Board: District will say farewell to Hinkle

    The Shelby County Board of Education will celebrate one of its own at Thursday’s 7 p.m. meeting at the board office, 1155 Main Street, the board’s final meeting of the 2012 calendar year.

    Superintendent James Neihof and former superintendents Leon Mooneyhan and Elaine Farris will recognize board member Sam Hinkle for his 12 years of service on the board. Hinkle lost his seat representing District 2 to Karen Sams in the November election.

    And that won’t be the only celebrating at the board meeting.

  • Teachers want to send deaf student on DC trip

    Since West Middle teacher Kelland Garland started the Presidential Leadership Program in 2009, he has been on the lookout for students to invite into the program.

    Although some cannot attend because of conflicting schedules, Garland doesn’t let that stop him from inviting those students on the group’s trip to Washington D.C., during spring break.

  • Southside, other low-scoring schools working to improve

    About one month removed from the state’s announced scores in the first year of Kentucky new assessment system, districts and individual schools are beginning to understand their scores more clearly.

    Shelby County’s overall district score was a little better than the middle of the pack statewide, falling in the 56th percentile and four schools earned proficient classifications, ranking in the 70th percentile or above in the state.