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Education

  • MAP results show ‘deflating’ trends

    Members of the Shelby County Board of Education heard good and bad news in the reports about the results from its two key standardized testing programs that were delivered during Thursday’s meeting at Heritage Elementary.

    News about the statewide KCCT test, reported last week, was almost all positive because each school and the district’s 2011 test results bested their own 3-year averages and state results.

    But this fall’s Measures of Academic Progress (MAP) testing came with mixed results.

  • Shelby County School Board: Martin, Zepeda are student reps

    The Shelby County School Board welcomed its two new student reps at Thursday’s meeting: Gwen Martin from Shelby County High School and Ashley Zepeda from Collins.

    Martin is a senior at SCHS with a 4.6-weighted grade-point average. She’s is the former junior class president and Technology Student Association vice president and treasurer. She now serves on the student council and is a Governor’s Scholar, along with a four-year member of Beta Club and several other activities.

  • Shelby County Public Schools: Reaction minimal at Simpsonville

    There was a very small turnout Tuesday night for a meeting at Simpsonville Elementary where parents learned more about the impact of the school’s falling into the No Child Left Behind School Improvement Plan, Year 1 category.

    After sending letters to every student's home, explaining that this evaluation would allow students to transfer to Painted Stone or Wright elementaries, if they so chose, the school’s administrators saw just two parents show up for the meeting.

  • EARLIER: Simpsonville Elementary fails NCLB growth model

    After reading reports of increased scores and improvement across the board for the district in the Kentucky Core Content Tests, parents of students at Simpsonville Elementary School may have been surprised this week by what they read in a letter they received from the school.

    By only meeting nine of 10 Adequate Yearly Progress (AYP) goals this year and hitting only 10 of 12 in 2010, Simpsonville missed meeting the federal government's No Child Left Behind AYP goals two years in row, which means the school falls into the School Improvement Plan, Year 1 category.

  • Shelby County School Board approves footprint for new Southside

    Kerry Whitehouse, assistant superintendent for operations, presented for approval Thursday the schematic design for the new Southside Elementary School, and the board voted its approval.

    The schematic consisted of the basic framework of the building.

    “The reddish portion you see on [on a graphic submitted] is the initial schematic design, and all the other colors remain to be put together,” he told the board about a color-coded diagram of the new school.

  • Shelby's 2011 grads were better prepared than most students statewide

    Students in the Class of 2011 from Shelby County were more ready for life after high school than most in Kentucky.

    Data released Tuesday by the Kentucky Department of Education shows that nearly 60 percent of 2011  high school graduates statewide left school unprepared for college or the workforce, but Shelby’s two high schools fared significantly better than that.

  • Shelby County school budget gets next review

    The Shelby County Board of Education will have a special called meeting Thursday at 7 p.m. at the Central Office, 1155 Main Street in Shelbyville.
    The meeting was moved from its regular time last Thursday because several board members were forced to miss the meeting due to other conflicts.
    The schedule for the meeting cannot be amended and will include a staff report on the first month’s attendance, votes on the 2011-12 working budget and the schematic design for the new Southside Elementary School.

  • Shelby County schools’ KCCT scores rocket upward

    Shelby County schools saw improved scores district-wide Tuesday in the most recent batch of results for the Kentucky Core Content Tests.

    The so-called CATS tests measure elementary, middle and high school scores in reading, math, science, social studies and writing, and the district topped the state's Proficient and Distinguished rating, its top rating, in all categories except high school social studies and writing. Those categories fell well short of the state’s mark.

  • EARLIER: Shelby's Adequate Yearly Progress lags vs. fed goals

    Although Shelby County Schools showed improvement across the board in KCCT testing, the federal No Child Left Behind results don’t take that into account.

    NCLB results released Tuesday show that only two Shelby County schools, Painted Stone and Wright elementary schools, met 100 percent of their Adequate Yearly Progress goals.

    However, seven of the remaining nine schools met at minimum of 73 percent of their AYP goals, and only Shelby County High School was lower, with 61.5 percent.

  • School helps remove gluten to the maximum

    Middle school is a crazy time.

    It's all about doing the right thing with the right people and fitting in.

    And that's all Melissa Baralt wanted for her daughter Kelly, a sixth-grader at West Middle.

    For years Melissa Baralt had been trying to get the school system to offer some gluten-free alternatives to work with her daughter's Celiac disease.