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Education

  • SCPS recognized for CCR improvement

    Shelby County Public Schools is one of 111 school districts in the state that has been recognized for its College and Career Readiness improvement.

    “Shelby County had a goal for at least fifty-four percent of our high school students to graduate college and career ready in 2015. In reality, seventy-one percent graduated ready as measured by the Unbridled Learning Accountability model,” SCPS public relations coordinator Ryan Allan explained.

  • Titans give back, get back

    Sitting quietly in a circle, peering up with admiration, a class of young Southside Elementary students listens eagerly to Collins’ senior Sarah Donnell read them a book, their attentive silence breaking only on occasion to laugh at her funny sound effects and gestures.

  • Shelby teen building a cultural bridge

    A local youth is making big strides for the Hispanic community and her work has recently earned her an impressive recognition.

    Ivonne Gonzales, an Eastern Kentucky University sophomore, has been honored with the University’s Martin Luther King Jr. Student Leadership Award for her efforts to educate others about, and promote the inclusion of, Hispanic culture.

  • Hats off to reading

    Children will be coming home from school this week with Wockets in their Pockets, Green Eggs and Ham in their tummies and hopefully a newfound love for reading in their hearts.

    On this day 112 years ago a man by the name of Theodor Seuss Geisel was born and would become one of the best-known children’s authors of our time, writing more than 60 books under the famous pseudonym Dr. Seuss.

    The late author’s unique and wildly tales of imaginary worlds and characters made his stories both interesting and iconic. 

  • SHELBY COUNTY SCHOOL BOARD – Board discusses goal progress

    Chief Academic Officer/Deputy Superintendent Lisa Smith gave an update Thursday at Shelby County Public Schools’ regularly scheduled board meeting on the district’s progress toward meeting their board goals for the 2015-16 school year.

    The goals are tied to the Strategic Leadership Plan, Smith explained.

  • Shelby County produces 2 Merit Finalists

    This year Shelby County has the honor of recognizing not one but two, National Merit Finalists.

    Raley Suter of Collins High School and Emma Saarinen of Shelbyville and a senior at the Gatton Academy of Mathematics and Science in Kentucky in Bowling Green at Western Kentucky University, have advanced to Finalist standing in the National Merit Scholarship Program.

  • Bevin’s proposed budget slashes could harm JCTC and beyond.

    Addressing a deficit of more than $30 billion in Kentucky’s pension fund, Governor Matt Bevin proposed some budget cuts in his State of the Commonwealth budget address late last month that could be a major blow to public postsecondary institutions.

    If approved by the legislature, Bevin’s spending plan would cut funding to postsecondary institutions by 4.5 percent for the remainder of the fiscal year and by 9 percent for the biennium.

    While many see that as cuts at our major universities, it will hit home as well.

  • Elementary student dropped at wrong stop

    District officials have extended their apologies to SCPS second grade student, Will Vanhoy and his parents after he was dropped off at the wrong bus stop Wednesday afternoon.

    “We made a mistake and we are sorry,” SCPS Public Relations Coordinator Ryan Allan said.  “We have reached out to the family and apologized.”

    The district explained that a substitute bus driver had dropped Will off at the wrong stop a few blocks away from his home. 

  • SHELBY COUNTY PUBLIC SCHOOLS – Manny Stone earns Teacher of the Year

    Teachers and faculty members rose to their feet in applause Thursday with the announcement of the 2015-16 Teacher of the Year for Shelby County Public Schools.

    As he heard his name, West Middle School social studies teacher Manny Stone dropped his face into his hands and covertly wiped tears from his eyes before his emotions overcame him and he rose to embrace his mother and friends at his table.

  • A smooth breakfast selection

    The Southeast United Dairy Industry Association recently recognized Collins High School for its increase in diary consumption, but it could barely be heard over the whirrrrrr of the school’s blenders.

    Over a one-year period, the school had a 40 percent jump in milk usage, said Evell Coomer, the district’s food service coordinator. The increase was a direct result of the recently introduced breakfast selection: smoothies.